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The Birthplace Blog

Struggling with Painful Sex?

The Birthplace


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Do you experience severe pain while having sex? Does it hurt when you try to insert a tampon into your vagina? If yes, then you are most likely dealing with acute involuntary contraction of your vaginal muscles which causes pain when something tries to penetrate through it. This condition is called Vaginismus.

What is Vaginismus?

Vaginismus is a condition that happens when the muscles around the opening to the vagina tighten up. The muscles tend to tighten when something is about to be placed in the vagina, such as a penis, tampon, or a medical device. It causes pain during sex and women might also complain of pain if a doctor or nurse tries to do a pelvic exam.

Vaginismus can happen if a woman has anxiety about sex or pelvic exams or has had a bad experience with either of these in the past. It can also happen if a woman has an infection or other medical condition in the vagina.

Dr. Samatha Kumar, is a senior gynecologist at the Birthplace with more than 11 years of experience, specializing in infertility, multiple births, and high-risk pregnancies.  To know more or to meet Dr. Samatha, please call 040-45208108. You can also write to her at  contactus@thebirthplace.com  or visit www.thebirthplace.com

Dr. Samatha Kumar, is a senior gynecologist at the Birthplace with more than 11 years of experience, specializing in infertility, multiple births, and high-risk pregnancies.

To know more or to meet Dr. Samatha, please call 040-45208108. You can also write to her at contactus@thebirthplace.com or visit www.thebirthplace.com

What are the symptoms of Vaginismus?

The main symptom of vaginismus is pain when something is tried to be put in the vagina. It could be a penis, finger, tampon, or medical device. Sometimes, the pain is so severe that you might not even allow trying to insert something into your vagina.

Should I see a doctor?

If having sex is painful then you must see your doctor. Your doctor will look for the cause through a pelvic exam. If the pain is severe that you can't start or continue an exam, let your doctor know when you feel it and where the pain is.

Is there a test for vaginismus?

No. There is no specific test to detect vaginismus. Your doctor should be able to tell if you have it by learning about your symptoms and doing a pelvic exam. He or she might be able to feel the muscles around the opening to your vagina tighten during an exam.

Looking for one-on-one counselling?

How is vaginismus treated? 

Treatments to cure vaginismus include - 

  • Treatment of any medical condition that is causing pain, such as an infection or skin irritation

  • Exercises to help relax the tight muscles

  • Physical therapy to loosen the muscles around your vagina

  • Using "dilators". These are devices that you place in your vagina that help you to get used to having something in the vagina. This is used along with numbing medicine to reduce the pain while inserting the dilators.

  • Using vaginal oestrogen. This treatment can help if you have been complaining of dryness or have been experiencing thinning of the tissues near the vagina. This usually occurs when a woman goes through her menopause (the time when you stop having monthly periods).

Don’t worry! You do not need to deal with this condition forever. Vaginismus is perfectly curable with the above treatments. Come visit the Birthplace today!


Laparoscopic Surgery: All you need to know

The Birthplace

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Laparoscopic or minimally invasive surgery is a modern surgical technique in which operations are performed through small incisions (0.5 – 1.5 cm). This surgery is named after the laparoscope, a tool that has a high definition video camera and light at the end which is inserted through the small incision to view the affected organs. Through this laparoscope a video is relayed on the monitor which enables the surgeon to view. In case of a surgery, few more incisions may be made and required instruments are inserted to perform the surgery. These instruments are sleek and slender and hence do not require a larger incision. And smaller incisions mean faster recovery!

Laparoscopic surgery was initially used for gallbladder surgery and gynecological surgeries but now it has expanded to play a major role in surgeries related to abdomen and intestine areas. It also has a key role in infertility treatments.

Where is laparoscopy applicable in Gynecology?

As a diagnostic tool laparoscopy can be used to treat-

  • Infertility

  • Ovarian cyst or tumors

  • Ectopic pregnancy

  • Tubal abscess or adhesions

  • Endometriosis

As a therapeutic tool  it can be used to treat the following organs in the mentioned ways

Dr. Girija Lakshmi is an Obstetrician & Gynecologist with a focus on Fertility & Preconception. She has also trained in hysteroscopy and laparoscopy. She has helped hundreds of women successfully manage symptoms of poly-cystic ovary syndrome, uterine fibroids and even menopause related issues through medical and surgical interventions.  To know more or to consult Dr. Girija, please call 040-45208108. You can also write to her at  contactus@thebirthplace.com  or visit www.thebirthplace.com

Dr. Girija Lakshmi is an Obstetrician & Gynecologist with a focus on Fertility & Preconception. She has also trained in hysteroscopy and laparoscopy. She has helped hundreds of women successfully manage symptoms of poly-cystic ovary syndrome, uterine fibroids and even menopause related issues through medical and surgical interventions.

To know more or to consult Dr. Girija, please call 040-45208108. You can also write to her at contactus@thebirthplace.com or visit www.thebirthplace.com

  • Ovary

    • Ovarian drilling for PCOD to boost fertility

    • Ovarian cystectomy for removal of cysts in the ovary

    • Cauterisation for endometriosis treatment

  •  Uterus

    • Myomectomy for removal of fibroids without affecting the healthy tissue of the uterus

    • Hysterectomy  for removal of the uterus

  •  Tubes

    • For treating a tubal abscess and ectopic tubal pregnancy

    • Tubal sterilisation (Family planning)

What are the advantages?

Compared to a traditional surgery, laparoscopic surgery goes a long way its advantages and is usually the advised type of surgery.

  • It minimises the number of incisions needed

  • Decreases pain

  • Reduces blood loss when compared to open surgery

  • Early mobilisation and faster recovery

  • Shorter stay at the hospital. This also means reducing hospitalisation bills.

How soon can a patient resume regular activities after laparoscopy?

 For minor procedures under diagnostic laparoscopy and infertility, you can resume to work in 1-2 days. But in case of a major surgery like Hysterectomy,  2-7 days of rest is recommended. It is also advised to avoid intercourse, douching, strenuous exercise or lifting body weights for 4 weeks.

What is the role of laparoscopy in unexplained infertility cases?

 Many times when the cause of infertility cannot be ascertained a diagnostic laparoscopy can evaluate the uterine cavity, tubes and ovaries and correct them if needed. This increases the success rate by 20-30%.

Looking for one-on-one counselling?

Can emergency surgeries be performed under laparoscopy?

Gynec emergency surgeries like ruptured ectopic pregnancy, twisted/torsion of ovarian cyst or a ruptured ovarian cyst can be performed laparoscopically but this majorly depends on the surgical experience and expertise of the performing surgeon.

 What is the type of anaesthesia administered?

General anaesthesia is usually administered for most of the gynecological surgeries.

At the Birthplace, we are equipped with the best laparoscopic equipments along with the most experienced Laparoscopic surgeon, Dr. Girija Lakshmi who is trained to perform all kinds of gynec laparoscopic surgeries. She has also helped a lot of women with infertility issues to conceive through diagnostic laparoscopy and treatments.

Come visit the Birthplace today!

 

Eating for Two..?!

The Birthplace

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During your pregnancy eating healthy is more important than ever. Without a doubt, a nutritious, well-balanced diet can be one of the first and best gifts you can give to your developing baby.

Nutrients in pregnancy:

Protein: It is critically essential for the body as it ensures proper growth of the fetal tissue, including the brain. It also helps with breast and uterine tissue growth during pregnancy and plays a major role in increasing blood supply, allowing more blood to be sent to the baby.

Servings per day: 3

Sources: Lentils, paneer, green peas, dals, beans, chicken, salmon, nuts, peanut butter, cottage cheese.

Calcium: It helps build your baby’s bones and regulates body’s use of fluids.

Servings per day: 3

Sources:  Milk, yogurt, cheese, cabbage, tofu, eggs, pudding.

Folate: Also known as folic acid, this drug plays an important part in reducing the risk of neural tube defects. This is a major birth defect that affects the baby’s brain and spinal cord, such as spina bifida and anencephaly.

Servings per day: 600 to 800 micrograms

Sources: Liver, nuts, dried beans and lentils, egg, nuts and peanut butter, dark green leafy vegetables.

Iron: It works with sodium, potassium, and water to increase blood flow which helps to ensure enough oxygen is supply to both the mother and the baby.

Serving per day: 27 milligrams

Sources: Dark green, leafy vegetables, citrus fruits, enriched breads or cereals, lean beef and poultry, eggs and dried fruits.

Looking for one-on-one counselling?

Evaluate your diet

Diet is important during pregnancy but it is a lot more important to make sure you’re eating a balanced and nutritious diet, so that, you and your growing baby can be as healthy as possible. Focus on the nutritional value of your diet and limit the intake of high fat, sugar, and sodium foods.

Eat:

  • three servings of protein per day

  • six or more servings of whole grains per day

  • five to six or more servings of fruits and vegetables per day

  • three or more servings of dairy products per day 

  • foods with essential fats

  • prenatal vitamins

Avoid:

Alcohol, excessive caffeine, raw meats and seafood, high-mercury fish, uncooked processed meats and unpasteurised dairy.

Nutrition is the key:

Women have increased nutritional needs during pregnancy. They need more protein, iron, calcium, and folic acid than they did before pregnancy. They  also need more calories.  Although the old adage of "eating for two" isn't  correct, a mom-to-be does require more micronutrients and macronutrients to support herself and her baby. It’s best to start adopting a healthy eating plan before pregnancy.

No matter the number of weeks left on your countdown calendar, it’s never too late to start! Supplying your body with a tasty blend of nutritious food can improve fertility, health during pregnancy, and pave the way for an easier labour.

Your body will gain weight during your pregnancy!

Your weight begins to increase as gestational weeks progress. Take it as proof that the body is nurturing the growing baby. On an average the baby has to grow to weigh 2.75-4 kilograms and to accomplish these productive changes, pregnant women need approximately 350 extra calories per day during their 2nd and 3rd trimester of pregnancy than they did before they were pregnant.

The ideal weight gain is usually 1-2 kgs in total during the first trimester and 1.5-2 kgs per month for the second and third trimester.

Other considerations

Apart from eating well, it’s important to drink at least eight glasses of water per day. You should also consume enough prenatal vitamins.

Here are few myths busted related to eating habits in pregnancy:

Myth: Pregnant women should be eating for two.

Fact: It is true that nutrient needs increase, but energy requirements only increase by about 150 calories / day in the first trimester and 350 calories per day for the second and third trimester of pregnancy.                                       

Myth: Low weight gain during pregnancy will make delivery easier.

Fact: Mothers who do not gain the required weight during pregnancy put their babies at a risk for severe complications. Complication like premature birth can cause lung and heart problems.

Myth: If the right amount of weight is gained during pregnancy, none of it will be fat gain.

Fact: A healthy pregnancy includes fat storage. A lot of energy is required during labor and breastfeeding which is used from these fat reserves.

Myth: A healthy pregnant woman will not experience discomforts.

Fact: Nausea, heartburn, and constipation are not biased! They will afflict women regardless of healthy living. However, women who regularly eat healthy food avoiding excess sugar and fat, drink plenty of water, exercise regularly may significantly reduce the uncomfortable symptoms of pregnancy.

With over 17 years of experience as a Clinical Nutritionist Dt. Manjusha K. R is a pioneer in the field. She has done her Masters in Nutrition & Dietetics and is a Life Member of Indian Dietetic Association & Nutrition Society of India .  She started her career as a Lecturer in Nutrition and was working with different multi speciality hospitals from 2001. Since 2014 she is associated with the Birthplace. With her experience as a clinical nutritionist and her association with doctors & physiotherapists she is perfectly equipped to deal with prenatal, postnatal and pediatric patients through one-on-one counselling.  To know more or to consult Dt. Manjusha, please call 040-45208108. You can also write to her at  contactus@thebirthplace.com  or visit www.thebirthplace.com

With over 17 years of experience as a Clinical Nutritionist Dt. Manjusha K. R is a pioneer in the field. She has done her Masters in Nutrition & Dietetics and is a Life Member of Indian Dietetic Association & Nutrition Society of India .

She started her career as a Lecturer in Nutrition and was working with different multi speciality hospitals from 2001. Since 2014 she is associated with the Birthplace. With her experience as a clinical nutritionist and her association with doctors & physiotherapists she is perfectly equipped to deal with prenatal, postnatal and pediatric patients through one-on-one counselling.

To know more or to consult Dt. Manjusha, please call 040-45208108. You can also write to her at contactus@thebirthplace.com or visit www.thebirthplace.com

Coffee is sometimes debated, as is fish. It is currently considered safe to drink up to one 12-ounce cup of coffee per day during pregnancy.

Fish contains essential fatty acids which are important for your baby’s brain development but some fish are high in mercury which can cause birth defects in your baby. Avoid eating Shark, Swordfish and King mackerel. Shrimp, Salmon, Catfish, and Pollock on the other end are generally considered safe.

Lastly, it goes without saying, avoid all alcohol and tobacco products during pregnancy for your baby’s healthy development.

Fetal Kick Counts - Why is it critical?

The Birthplace

You are probably worried about what’s going on with your baby because there’s no way to tell unless you see your doctor. But by the time you are in your third trimester, there is an easy technique that you can use at home - Fetal Kick Counts.

Feeling your baby’s kicks and jabs and wriggles is one of the most exciting things in your pregnancy! It is almost as if it’s your baby’s way of constantly reminding you to be excited and surprised about what’s going on in your tummy!

Kick counts are important because it gives you an insight into your baby’s pattern and helps you understand if something is off. Keeping your doctor informed of your babies movements may help her address any problems if the baby is in distress. Usually earlier than 28 weeks, your baby doesn’t have a pattern, so any movement is good. Once you hit your third trimester, your baby’s kicks become stronger and more predictable - that’s when you can start on your kick counts.

Here is what you need to look out for:

When - Sometime in the morning when the baby’s kicks are less frequent because you are more active and then sometime in the evening when you are relaxing is when the kicks can be more frequent and noticeable. Its better felt when you are hungry and when you have just eaten.

How - Make a note of the time and count upto 10 kicks and record the time again. This includes any kicks, wriggles, swishes or flutters. 10 kicks in 10 hours - Cardiff count of 10!

Note - 3 kicks in 1 hour, post major meals is very reassuring.

What if you don’t feel 10 movements - Eat a snack or drink a juice and lie down then count for next 1 hour. If you still do not feel at least 3 movements then, contact your doctor. This may not necessarily mean something is wrong but it’s always a good idea to get it checked.

Remember - As you move closer to your due date, regular checking of fetal movements becomes more important. If you notice a sudden decrease in the movements, contact your doctor.

Even if your pregnancy is not a high-risk one, it is important that you count your baby’s movements regularly. In fact, it could save your baby’s life! Counting kicks is an important way to help prevent stillbirth because monitoring can help identify any problem.

Dr. Pratibha Narayan is a Senior Obstetrician and Gynecologist at the Birthplace. In addition to her passion for obstetrics and preventive women's health, she an expert with many years of experience in VBAC. She excels and specializes in managing and treating routine and high-risk pregnancies, and recurrent pregnancy losses. She is also an expert in Cosmetic and aesthetic gynaecology.  To know more or to meet Dr. Pratibha, please call 040-45208108.

Dr. Pratibha Narayan is a Senior Obstetrician and Gynecologist at the Birthplace. In addition to her passion for obstetrics and preventive women's health, she an expert with many years of experience in VBAC. She excels and specializes in managing and treating routine and high-risk pregnancies, and recurrent pregnancy losses. She is also an expert in Cosmetic and aesthetic gynaecology.

To know more or to meet Dr. Pratibha, please call 040-45208108.

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Bleeding During Pregnancy

The Birthplace

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Bleeding or spotting during pregnancy is a very common sign noticed by most pregnant women. Research indicates that around 12% of women report spotting or bleeding during their first 12 weeks of pregnancy. This bleeding is usually very light compared to your regular periods and often varies in colour from pink to red to brown. Although this spotting is not something you should worry about, but any kind of bleeding during your pregnancy has to be reported to your obstetrician to ensure the cause is validated to rule out anything serious and to make sure you and your baby are healthy.

This article will help you understand the causes of bleeding or spotting during each trimester.

First Trimester

As indicated earlier most women report spotting or bleeding in the first 3 months of their pregnancy. Possible causes of first trimester bleeding include:

  • Implantation bleeding:  Bleeding that occurs when the fertilised egg implants itself into the uterine lining is called implantation bleeding. This is usually experienced within 6 to 12 days of conception, even before you know you are pregnant, and is often mistaken as a pending period. This bleeding is usually very light and lasts from a few hours to a few days.

  • Miscarriage: Miscarriage is one of the biggest concerns associated with the first trimester bleeding as it also occurs within 12 weeks of pregnancy. However, bleeding during the first trimester does not necessarily mean that you’ve lost the baby or going to miscarry. 90% of women who experience first trimester bleeding will not miscarry if there is a heartbeat noticed in the ultrasound.

    Strong cramps in the lower abdomen and tissue passing through the vagina are the other symptoms of miscarriage.

  • Ectopic Pregnancy: An ectopic pregnancy occurs when the fertilised embryo implants outside of the uterus, usually in the fallopian tube. It occurs in about 2% of pregnancies and is potentially dangerous. If untreated immediately, the embryo keeps growing and can cause the fallopian tube to burst and can be life-threatening to the mother.

  • Molar pregnancy: This is a less common condition in which abnormal tissue grows inside the uterus instead of a baby. In some cases, this tissue is cancerous and can affect the other parts of the body.

    Apart from bleeding, nausea and vomiting and rapid enlargement of the uterus are the other symptoms of this condition.

Dr. Girija Lakshmi is an Obstetrician & Gynecologist with a focus on Fertility & Preconception. She has also trained in hysteroscopy and laparoscopy. She has helped hundreds of women successfully manage symptoms of poly-cystic ovary syndrome, uterine fibroids and even menopause related issues through medical and surgical interventions.  To know more or to consult Dr. Girija, please call 040-45208108. You can also write to her at  contactus@thebirthplace.com  or visit www.thebirthplace.com

Dr. Girija Lakshmi is an Obstetrician & Gynecologist with a focus on Fertility & Preconception. She has also trained in hysteroscopy and laparoscopy. She has helped hundreds of women successfully manage symptoms of poly-cystic ovary syndrome, uterine fibroids and even menopause related issues through medical and surgical interventions.

To know more or to consult Dr. Girija, please call 040-45208108. You can also write to her at contactus@thebirthplace.com or visit www.thebirthplace.com

Second and Third Trimesters

Bleeding in the second or third trimester of your pregnancy calls for immediate attention as this may be more serious and can signal a problem with the mother or the baby. You must report to your Obstetrician with no further delay.

Here are few possible causes of bleeding in late pregnancy:

  • Placenta Previa: This is a condition when the placenta is attached to the lower part of the uterus and covers the cervix partially or completely. In this scenario, a vaginal delivery is not possible and a C-section is recommended as the placenta blocks the baby’s path of your body. This is very rare in the late third trimester, and stats show only 1 in 200 pregnancies have placenta previa. A bleeding placenta previa is an emergency which requires immediate medical attention.

  • Placental Abruption: This is a serious condition wherein the placenta detaches itself from the uterus wall before or during labor. The abruption usually causes stomach pain and the other symptoms may include abdominal pain, clots from the vagina, tender uterus and back pain.

  • Uterine Rupture: Uterine rupture occurs when a scar from a previous C-section tears open during pregnancy. This is a life-threatening condition and requires an emergency C-section. Pain and tenderness in the abdomen are the other symptoms of uterine rupture.

  • Vasa Previa: This is a very rare condition in which the developing baby's blood vessels in the umbilical cord cross the opening to the birth canal. Vasa previa can be very dangerous as it can cause the blood vessels to tear open which in turn causes the baby to bleed severely and lose oxygen. Abnormal fetal heart rate and excessive bleeding are signs to look out for.

  • Premature Labor:  This is the most common sort of bleeding seen late in pregnancy wherein a small amount of blood with mucus leaves the body.  This is an indication that your body is preparing for labor. This is also called as ‘Show’. If bleeding and symptoms of labor begin before the 37th week you should contact your obstetrician immediately as this might be a sign of preterm labor.

    Contractions, vaginal discharge, abdominal pressure, and ache in the lower back are the other symptoms of Premature labor.

Other  causes of bleeding in late pregnancy could be injury to the cervix or vagina, polyps or cancer.

Looking for one-on-one counselling?

What should you do if you have unusual bleeding during pregnancy?

Vaginal bleeding in any trimester should not be ignored and you should report to your Obstetrician immediately. Use a sanitary napkin to track the flow and record the type of blood. Do not use a tampon and refrain from having sex while you are bleeding. Make sure you bring any tissue that passes through your vagina to your obstetrician for testing.

You will be expected to undergo an ultrasound scan to understand the underlying cause of bleeding and treatment is given accordingly depending on the stage of your pregnancy.

Menopause: Pausing Periods, Not Life!

The Birthplace


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‘That time of the month’ is often the phase characterised by mood swings, cramps, pain and discomfort. Women share a love-hate relationship with their periods. Often times, the onset of periods brings about tremendous changes in a woman’s life - right from altering her physical appearance, to changing her routine completely. This is the time when women are worried about staining their clothes and plan important events in a way that they don’t clash with their periods. One thing that crosses many young girls’ minds when they first have their periods is - when will this thing end?

The answer to this question is simple - periods end when menopause happens.

Understanding Menopause

Medically defined as the full-stop to a woman’s fertility, menopause marks the end of menstruation in a woman’s life. While it might seem like a really good deal that life has to hand over to you (imagine, you don’t need a period tracker, you don’t have to worry getting your periods when you are on a vacation and all that), what menopause actually introduces is a different ball game altogether.

 Menopause happens when a woman hasn’t had her periods for 12 consecutive months. Typically, the average age for menopause is 51 years, but many women experience an early onset, too. When the ovaries produce less reproductive hormones and there is a considerable decline in estrogen (needed to regulate your periods) and progesterone (needed for pregnancy), that’s when the symptoms of menopause begin to appear. It also often triggers the rise of another hormone called follicular stimulating hormone or FSH.

When Will You Have Menopause And How Long Will It Last?

There are a lot of factors that determine when you will hit this phase. Even though the average age, like mentioned above, is 45-55 years, yet, your genetic make-up, your body type and health will play a role. The symptoms of menopause, which we will describe in the paragraphs to come, start anywhere between 2-4 years before you have your last period, and might go on till around 5 years after that.

What Does Menopause Do To Your Body?

Just like the beginning of puberty brings about evident physical and psychological changes, the onset of menopause also has the same impacts. While the absence of periods might seems like a great relief, yet, the symptoms of this phase can impact you more than you can think.

  • Period Problems: One of the most common impacts that the onset of menopause, or what is typically known as perimenopause, is problems in your menstruation. This can range from irregular periods, or changes in your flow - while sometimes you’d experience a very light period, on other occasions, you might experience heavy bleeding. During this phase, it’s important that you be mentally prepared as your periods can arrive without much warning, or be absent for long.

  • Lack of Sleep or Insomnia: Menopause is characterised by hot flashes, when your upper body feels warm, and night sweats, when you break into a sweat while you are sleeping. It’s obvious therefore that these lead to disturbed sleep cycles, often times causing insomnia.

  •  Vaginal Dryness: Decline in the production of estrogen can lead to genital tract atrophy, which is known to cause problems in the vulva and vaginal region, because of which you might experience swelling of the genital region, vaginal dryness and consequently, painful sexual intercourse.

  •  Urinary Issues: Such issues become very common with advancing age, yet, the impact that menopause has on the urinary system is quite high. If you are going through menopause, you are more susceptible to urinary tract infections or UTIs and you would also have an urge to visit the washroom often, which in medical terms will be explained to you as urinary incontinence. 

  •  Mood Swings and Cognitive difficulties: Just like your premenstrual symptoms or PMS as it’s popularly known as, mood swings will become a part of your routine when you hit menopause. Because your body is going through several hormonal changes, it is likely to impact your mood, as well as your cognitive abilities like remembering things.

  •  Physical Changes: While puberty results in a growth spurt, both in terms of your breasts and bodily hair, menopause does the exact opposite. If you find that you need to switch to a smaller bra size, then don’t be worried - it’s probably one of the effects of menopause. It might also lead to hair fall and thinning of hair.

Apart from these, palpitations, regular headaches, muscle and bone pain, stiff joints and weight gain can be clear signals that you are going through menopause.

Dr. Pratibha Narayan is a Senior Obstetrician and Gynecologist at the Birthplace. In addition to her passion for obstetrics and preventive women's health, she an expert with many years of experience in VBAC. She excels and specializes in managing and treating routine and high-risk pregnancies, and recurrent pregnancy losses. She is also an expert in Cosmetic and aesthetic gynaecology.  To know more or to meet Dr. Pratibha, please call 040-45208108. You can also write to her at  contactus@thebirthplace.com  or visit www.thebirthplace.com

Dr. Pratibha Narayan is a Senior Obstetrician and Gynecologist at the Birthplace. In addition to her passion for obstetrics and preventive women's health, she an expert with many years of experience in VBAC. She excels and specializes in managing and treating routine and high-risk pregnancies, and recurrent pregnancy losses. She is also an expert in Cosmetic and aesthetic gynaecology.

To know more or to meet Dr. Pratibha, please call 040-45208108. You can also write to her at contactus@thebirthplace.com or visit www.thebirthplace.com

Early Menopause: The Causes And Impacts?

Menopause is a natural process, so please don’t consider it as a disease or disorder. As the body ages, its ability to produce certain hormones also decreases. Like mentioned before, when the levels of estrogen and progesterone come down, your body prepares itself for a goodbye to periods. However, apart from natural causes, there are a few other reasons why you might have an early menopause.

  • Hysterectomy: This is the procedure of removing your uterus, ovaries or both. If only your uterus is removed, you will not have menopause immediately, and the transition will be gradual. However, if your uterus and both your ovaries are removed, you will stop producing estrogen and progesterone, will cause immediate menopause.

  • Cancer Treatments: Chemotherapy and radiation, as you understand, have several radical impacts on your body, one of them being menopause. Sometimes, however, many women observe the return of their periods after a prolonged absence.

  • Ovarian Issues: Lifestyle and other health issues could cause your ovaries to have issues. Such problems might impact that the production of certain hormones, which in turn trigger the onset of menopause.

Early menopause is often associated with higher risks of cardiovascular diseases, anxiety and depression and psychosexual disorders.

Diagnosis of Menopause

Menopause is clinically confirmed if you are 45 or above and you haven’t had your periods in 12 straight months. Even though this is one way of diagnosing menopause, yet, your gynaecologist is likely to carry out some tests to rule out anything else. During this consultation, your doctor will check for:

  1. Your last period, the kind of flow you experienced and whether it was regular or late.

  2. Medications you are using, if any.

  3. Your symptoms and how long you have been having them for.

 Once that is done, your gynecologist might also ask for the following tests:

  1. Vaginal pH levels (women in the reproductive age have a level of 4.5, while a level of 6 could indicate menopause)

  2. A Thyroid Test

  3. Lipid Profile

  4. Liver Function Test

  5. Kidney Function Test

 Even though there are some kits available to check for yourself, yet, it’s always best to consult a reputed gynaecologist for a proper diagnosis.

Will Menopause Impact Your Sex Life?

Menopause causes several of your hormones to be in a state of imbalance. Because your production of estrogen and testosterone (yes, women also have it) has decreased, it might contribute to a lower sex drive. Apart from that, other symptoms such as mood swings and muscular pain might also prevent you from enjoying sex. 

Lower production of estrogen could also limit blood supply to your vagina, resulting in swelling and dryness. This could impact sex as well, making it slightly more uncomfortable and painful than usual.

However, you needn’t lose hope! Some studies have suggested that many women report having an increased sexual appetite because of the lower chances of pregnancy. While most women hit menopause after their children-related responsibilities are taken care of, the chances of having more relaxed sex also increases!

Managing Menopause: The Guidelines

The phase of menopause can be quite a challenging one, especially because some of the symptoms will leave your drained and in pain. The first step is to be calm and gather more information about it, so that you can manage the symptoms well. There are some things that you can do to help yourself.

  • Eat right: Include plenty of calcium and Vitamin D in your diet

  • Avoid drinking and smoking

  • Massage your breasts with herbal oils

  • Use lubricants to have better sex

  • Do not stop using birth control measures till your doctor asks you to

  • Keep yourself engaged in activities to help your mood swings

  • Exercise well to manage your weight gain

  • Kegel exercises can help with your sex life as well as urinary incontinence

 Why Do You Need To Visit A Gynecologist?

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You are capable of managing many of the symptoms, but the absence of periods might not necessarily mean menopause. So, it’s essential to confirm the cause and only a gynaecologist can help with that. Apart from that, if your symptoms are severe, your doctor will be able to suggest several treatment options including hormone replacement therapy or HRT to help you.

Please understand that you are not alone in this journey. At the Birthplace, we intend to help you sail through the phase of menopause with maximum comfort and information. Our doctors listen to your concerns and recommend treatments and therapies based on your needs. So, don’t do this alone. Let us join forces with you to help you live your life on your own terms!


When Menstruation can truly feel like a curse!

The Birthplace

12 lakh women will undergo a hysterectomy this year.

Long ago the Menstrual period was routinely referred to as the curse, giving the unique physiological function of a woman’s body an unwanted and negative connotation. We as a community are slowly but surely breaking the taboo around this “bloody” issue in most situations but for those amongst us who suffer from pain during periods, it may still feel like a curse.

Do you suffer from pain during one or more days of your period?

Have you ever made or altered plans because of approaching periods?

Have you ever taken a day off from school or work due to periods?

Have you had anxiety about your upcoming period?

Have you ever taken pain killers for period cramps?

If the answers to any of the above questions is yes, then this might help you. Read on.

I thought period cramps are pretty normal. Doesn’t everyone have them?

Nearly 25 percent of all women and 70-90 percent of adolescent girls suffer from period cramps. Mild to moderate cramps in the lower abdomen lasting for few hours in some and maybe up to 3 days in others which are easily relieved by home remedies or mild pain killers are usually seen in young girls. The pain may begin only after a year of the beginning of menses. This is called Primary dysmenorrhea and is not generally associated with any underlying disease process.

Although this type of painful periods can be quite common, they do cause some distress in young girls. Pain during periods that starts later in life and due to underlying conditions like Adenomyosis, Fibroid uterus or Endometriosis etc is called Secondary Dysmenorrhea. Secondary dysmenorrhea can last even after the period bleeding is over.

Dr. Jyotsna is an MD (Ob Gyn) from one of the top medical institutions in the country (JIPMER). In addition to her passion for obstetrics and preventive women's health, she is also an expert in gynecological endoscopy, with a special interest in the management of uterine fibroids and endometriosis.  To know more or to consult Dr. Jyotsna, please call 040-45208108. You can also write in to her at  contactus@thebirthplace.com  or visit www.thebirthplace.com

Dr. Jyotsna is an MD (Ob Gyn) from one of the top medical institutions in the country (JIPMER). In addition to her passion for obstetrics and preventive women's health, she is also an expert in gynecological endoscopy, with a special interest in the management of uterine fibroids and endometriosis.

To know more or to consult Dr. Jyotsna, please call 040-45208108. You can also write in to her at contactus@thebirthplace.com or visit www.thebirthplace.com

I was told my painful periods will sort themselves out and I don’t need to seek a doctor.

In most cases of primary dysmenorrhea, that’s true. Pain during periods can reduce over a period of time and usually after childbirth. But if pain persists or increases with age it’s a reason to consult a doctor.  In any case, no woman should ever need to suffer through pain for a condition that can be easily helped. Take help when you feel the need for it.

What are the other changes associated with period pain?

Many women experience bloating sensation in the abdomen, constipation before onset of period and sometimes loose stools after the onset. Mood changes, nausea, a lack of appetite, headaches and passing of clots in the menstrual discharge with heavy bleeding are some of the associated symptoms.

What are the simple precautions and remedies that can help in reducing the pain?

Simple remedies like using a hot water bag to the abdomen and back, massaging the lower abdomen gently and rest may give adequate relief. Drinking plenty of water and exercising regularly can reduce the severity of pain in a large number of women. Exercise has the additional benefit of keeping your cycles regular. Reduce the intake of junk food , too much coffee and tea,  excessive salt and processed food in your diet. Avoid alcohol & smoking. Check for any mineral and vitamin deficiencies and correct them.

Why do I need tests if dysmenorrhea is so common? Can’t I just take pain killers?

Primary dysmenorrhea doesn’t really need any tests. Most of the time the decision to investigate a woman with dysmenorrhea is influenced by the pattern of pain and severity of pain. Considering the changes in today’s lifestyle even one day off from work or school may not be welcome. Not everyone can afford to take rest.  Therefore, it becomes important for doctors to try and reduce a woman’s suffering. With that in mind gynaecologists tend to do detailed clinical examination some preliminary tests to rule out any underlying conditions. An ultrasound scan of the pelvis and Vaginal swabs for culture are done initially. If we find something on Ultrasound, further tests like MRI, or diagnostic Laparoscopy may be advised.

Pain that lasts for few hours on the first 3 days and not severe can be treated conservatively. But pain that appears in older women, lasting through the period and sometimes even after it and pain that seems to be increasing in intensity over many months, may be due to some underlying condition like Fibroids, Endometriosis, Infections, Uterine shape abnormalities etc. In some such cases simple painkillers may not be enough.

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What are some conditions causing period pain that may need treatment other than pain killers?

Adenomyosis: A condition where the inner lining of the uterus grows into the muscle of the uterus. Typically seen in older women after child-bearing years. It causes pain during periods and during sexual intercourse too. This condition reduces after menopause. If the pain is not controlled by painkillers the only possible long term relief is by the removal of the uterus [ a hysterectomy].

Endometriosis: A condition where the cells of the inner lining of uterus are found outside the uterus, typically on the ovaries, fallopian tubes, outer surface of the uterus and intestine. This can occur at any age. It causes thick walled cysts in the ovary and a lot of pain even after the period is over. Various modes of treatment are applied based on the need for child-bearing, severity of symptoms etc. Its a progressively worsening condition hence many women end up with a need for surgery.

Fibroid uterus: A benign condition where small hard lumps of muscle cells form in the wall of the uterus. The increase in size and distortion of the shape of the uterus can cause pain and heavy bleeding during periods. Depending on symptoms and size it is treated with medications or surgery.

Pelvic inflammatory disease: This is a condition where there is infection transmitted from the vagina into the uterus and around it. It causes severe pain, fever and discomfort during urination and passing stool. Although if treated at the right time it can resolve completely, repeated infections can cause chronic long term pain.

Ovarian cysts: Fluid filled sacs occurring in the ovaries are called cysts. They may be simple cysts filled with clear fluid or endometriosis-induced cysts, filled with blood. Typically blood filled cysts cause period pain and may sometimes need extra measures other than plain painkiller medications. Large cysts need surgery.

What are the usual ways to treat period pain?

Primary dysmenorrhoea is mostly relieved by the non-medical home remedies and lifestyle changes detailed earlier. If the pain disturbs the day-to-day activities its not such a bad idea to take mild pain killers like acetaminophen [or paracetamol].

In cases of secondary dysmenorrhoea, the treatment depends on the underlying condition, the need for child-bearing, the response to medical treatment etc. Medications may include pain killers, hormonal tablets or injections, non-hormonal medications that alter periods etc. Surgery is suggested only if the conservative treatments don’t work.

Remember,  there is no need to suffer the pain of menses. Seek help when you need it.

Vaginal Rejuvenation: The Route to Painless Happiness

The Birthplace


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She’s happy with a meal of leftovers from her children’s plate. She’s happy being the trouble-shooter of the family. From being the designated chef to the homework master, women often make their families their world, protecting and nurturing them with all their love and care.

From being a daughter and sister to being a wife and mother, it’s beautiful how you can transition into any role effortlessly. That’s partly because as a woman, selflessness comes to you quite easily and putting others before yourself is just a natural instinct.

It’s no surprise, therefore, that you ignore the ‘small niggles’ your health encounters, often labelling them as nothing serious. Even though this might bring great satisfaction, yet, ladies, you need to understand that it’s only when you are healthy will you be happy in the truest sense of the term.


Genital Wellness: A Topic That Needs Attention

Many women often take their genital well-being very lightly. Even though some attention is being paid to this important aspect with the introduction of creams and other products specifically for female genitalia, yet, most women either feel embarrassed to talk about it, or just brush it under the carpet thinking it’s not necessary at all.

The fact of the matter is problems in the female intimate parts have more repercussions than one in the overall health of a woman and they need to be addressed by booking an appointment with a reputed obstetrician and gynecologist. Before we get into details of what those problems are, it’s important for you to understand everything about the female genitalia.

Structure of The Female Genitalia: What Is Normal And What Is Not

The female genitalia is a rather complex system. There are several parts that together form the external reproductive organs in women and all of these parts are extremely critical in their own ways. Broadly, these parts can be categorised as:

  • The Mons Pubis: This is the soft fleshy part that covers the upper portion of the pubic bone. One of the characteristics of this portion is that upon puberty, one can find hair growth here.

  • Labia Majora: Literally translating to big lips, it refers to the folds that cover some of the internal genital parts.

  • Labia Minora: These are the fleshy parts that lie inside the labia majora and loosely translate to small lips. The texture of this not the usual skin-like appearance of the labia majora - it’s moist because of the presence of blood vessels that give it a pink colour. This part covers the opening of the urethra and the vagina.

  • Introitus: This is the opening to the vagina and it is where the penis enters during intercourse. This is also the part through which menstrual bleeding and the final stages of childbirth happen.

  • Clitoris: This sensitive part is located between the labia minora at their upper end. Its most important function is during intercourse.

  • Vagina: Then of course, there’s vagina where the sperm gets deposited to kick-start reproduction.

Dr. Pratibha Narayan is a Senior Obstetrician and Gynecologist at the Birthplace. In addition to her passion for obstetrics and preventive women's health, she an expert with many years of experience in VBAC. She excels and specializes in managing and treating routine and high-risk pregnancies, and recurrent pregnancy losses. She is also an expert in Cosmetic and aesthetic gynaecology.  To know more or to meet Dr. Pratibha, please call 040-45208108. You can also write to her at  contactus@thebirthplace.com  or visit www.thebirthplace.com

Dr. Pratibha Narayan is a Senior Obstetrician and Gynecologist at the Birthplace. In addition to her passion for obstetrics and preventive women's health, she an expert with many years of experience in VBAC. She excels and specializes in managing and treating routine and high-risk pregnancies, and recurrent pregnancy losses. She is also an expert in Cosmetic and aesthetic gynaecology.

To know more or to meet Dr. Pratibha, please call 040-45208108. You can also write to her at contactus@thebirthplace.com or visit www.thebirthplace.com

Even though every woman has her own unique body type and the shapes and sizes of genitalia might differ, yet, there are a few things that are not normal. It’s important to understand these problems so that the doctor can take corrective measures without wasting too much time. 

While bulging of the labia minora during arousal is normal, yet, if you find that the inner or outer lips are enlarged most of the times, it might be indicative of a problem. Apart from posing health threats, such bulging could also prevent you from opting for certain types of clothing and might dampen your confidence.

Any itching or redness should be addressed immediately. It could be hiding an infection that could impact your routine life. Also talk to your doctor if you are suffering from smelly or discoloured discharge. Urinary incontinence could be another problem as well. If the appearance of your genital parts bother you (like looseness), your doctor will be the best person to suggest treatments to you.

Problems in Female Genitalia

Being an extremely complex yet sensitive region, any problem in the female genitalia should not be ignored. There are appearance related issues that crop up after a certain age, but they are not limited to that. Problems in the region could include:

  1. Loose muscles, causing problems in appearance

  2. Infections

  3. Loss of elasticity in vaginal muscles due to sex, childbirth or age

  4. Urinary Incontinence

  5. Vaginal Dryness

  6. Vaginismus

Even though these are just a few problems that we have outlined, there are several other issues, like we had mentioned above, that have burning, pain while urinating and excessive vaginal discharge as symptoms. Whatever the case might be, since the genitalia plays a critical role in your sexual and overall well-being, any aberration must be immediately reported to your doctor.

How Do These Problems Impact Your Life?

Imagine being inside an important meeting, delivering the presentation you have been meticulously working upon. Just when you are about to present the game-changer, your bladder alerts you. You had just gone to the washroom right before the meeting, but you still have the urge to relieve yourself immediately. It’s most probably caused by urinary incontinence. Now imagine you sneeze and you feel a trickle. That’s stress incontinence. It’s not a very pleasant situation, obviously.

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Problems in your genital area could have a direct impact on your sexual well-being as well. That can have ripple effects on your relationships and overall mental health as well. Apart from these important points, the appearance of the genital area has a lot to do with the levels of confidence many women have.

It therefore becomes critical to identify these issues with the help of a reputed doctor and get them treated as soon as possible, so that you are spared from having long-term impacts.

So, What Are Your Options: Surgical Help?

With plastic and cosmetic surgery seeing a demand unlike anytime in history, for many women, a surgical reconstruction looks like the only option. However, not many of you opt for it because of various reasons.

  • In a country like India, many women find it embarrassing and difficult to talk about issues down there.

  • Surgical options are expensive

  • They are also perceived to be very painful.

  • The downtime involved is quite high, keeping you off your hectic routine for far too long.

Non-Surgical Vaginal Rejuvenation: The Significance

With healthcare progressing leaps and bounds, painless and non-surgical interventions are taking on almost every aspect of medicine. From minimally-invasive surgeries to incision less and scarless procedures, healthcare now provides ‘tear-less’ solutions to several health conditions. That’s where cosmetic and aesthetic gynaecology comes into the picture.

With several non-surgical methods to help women achieve healthy genitalia without the need for surgical procedures, cosmetic and aesthetic gynaecology is the next big thing for women. Let’s understand how non-surgical procedures can help you.

  • Vaginal Laxity: When the vaginal muscles lose their tightness, they could bring along several problems for women associated with body image and sex life. The causes of vaginal laxity are often attributed to age, hormones and most of the times, childbirth. With the use of lasers and RF (Radio Frequency), doctors are now able to tighten the vaginal canal, as both these procedures uses heat to promote collagen production.

  • Labia Majora Looseness: With age, the labia majora could lose its volume, thereby affecting appearance and the confidence levels of the woman. Rejuvenation and contouring of labia majora is now possible with the use of dermal fillers that give it the volume it needs. In this case too, laser and RF can be used if the doctor feels it will be effective.

  • Urinary Incontinence: Believe it or not, now your embarrassingly high number of loo visits can be cut short using cosmetic and aesthetic gynaecology. Specific treatments are administered to fix stress and urinary incontinence. 

  • Scar Correction: If you have had a surgical procedure down there, it could leave behind scars that might affect you psychologically. With the use of non-surgical treatments, your doctor can now correct stretch marks, cesarean scars and episiotomy scars.

  • Vaginal Dryness: With what is now popularly known as the ‘O’ shot or a shorter version of orgasm shot, women can now experience easy arousal and bid goodbye caused due to vaginal dryness. PRP or platelet rich plasma is drawn from your own blood and injected just above the clitoris. This helps reduce pain during sex and promotes more natural lubrication.

  • Others: Right from taking care of your mons pubis, to fixing wrinkles in your intimate area, non-surgical aesthetic and cosmetic gynaecology procedures can help get rid of vaginismus and even help you bleach the sensitive area down there. They also take care of recurrent vaginal infections, especially after normal deliveries and during the perimenopausal period.

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Choose The Right Doctor

Cosmetic and aesthetic gynaecology is a relatively new field and not many have ventured into it. Even though it looks like a great option, you should always be careful as to who you get it done from. If these procedures are performed by capable doctors, you will not experience any pain, but there are chances of mild discomfort. In that case, please notify your doctor so that appropriate medical action can be taken. You might experience mild vaginal discharge too, which your doctor will tell you about. However, any excessive discharge must be brought to the doctor’s notice immediately.

At Hyderabad, The Birthplace is the pioneer in this field. With reputed doctors and state-of-the-art equipment to assist the experienced hands, if you are thinking of getting vaginal rejuvenation done, please do visit us and we’ll be happy to help!


Planning Pregnancy after 35..?

The Birthplace


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Have you crossed 35 and are planning to conceive?

Yes! Then you are in good company. Many women are delaying pregnancy well into their 30s and beyond and are delivering healthy babies. The risks of pregnancy after 35 tend to get exaggerated but taking special care can help give you and your baby the best start.

Here are some challenges that you may face if you are planning to conceive post 35.

  • Getting pregnant might take a longer time. You are born with a limited number of eggs at birth. By puberty, you lose half of your eggs and by the time you reach your mid-to-late 30s, your eggs decrease in quantity and quality. Also at an older age, the eggs aren’t fertilized as easily as it would when you were younger. If you are in your late 30’s and haven’t been able to conceive for six months, consider consulting your obstetrician for advice.

  • Multiple pregnancy is very likely to occur. Hormonal changes with older age could cause the release of multiple eggs at the same time and hence increasing the chances of having twins. Pregnancy through assisted reproductive technologies may also result in conceiving twins.

  • The risk of pregnancy loss is higher. As you get older, perhaps due to pre-existing medical conditions or fetal chromosomal abnormalities, you are at a higher risk of having a miscarriage or a stillbirth. Research suggests that this may be due to a combination of a decrease in the quality of your eggs and an increase in the risk of chronic medical conditions such as high blood pressure and diabetes. During your last weeks of pregnancy, your obstetrician might suggest regular monitoring to ensure the well - being of the mother and the child.

  • The risk of chromosome abnormalities is higher. Babies born to mothers above the age of 35 are at a higher risk of certain chromosome problems, such as Down syndrome.

  • You’re more likely to develop gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes occurs only during pregnancy and is more common for women conceiving at an older age. Diabetes during pregnancy can cause the baby to grow larger than the average - increasing the risk of injuries during delivery. It is needed to control blood sugar levels through diet and physical activity to decrease the risk of preterm delivery, high blood sugar, and complications to your infant post birth.

  • You’re also likely to develop high blood pressure during pregnancy. High blood pressure that develops during pregnancy is most commonly seen in older women. You will need to visit your obstetrician more frequently to monitor your blood pressure and your baby’s development. If needed, you might have to deliver before your due date to avoid complications.

Dr. Samatha Kumar, is a senior gynecologist at the Birthplace with more than 11 years of experience, specializing in infertility, multiple births, and high-risk pregnancies.  To know more or to meet Dr. Samatha, please call 040-45208108. You can also write to her at  contactus@thebirthplace.com  or visit www.thebirthplace.com

Dr. Samatha Kumar, is a senior gynecologist at the Birthplace with more than 11 years of experience, specializing in infertility, multiple births, and high-risk pregnancies.

To know more or to meet Dr. Samatha, please call 040-45208108. You can also write to her at contactus@thebirthplace.com or visit www.thebirthplace.com

  • You’re more likely to have a premature birth. Premature birth often comes with complicated medical problems, especially for the babies born the earliest. They may also have very low birth weight.

  • You might need a C-section. Women conceiving at an older age are at a higher risk of pregnancy-related complications that might lead to a Cesarean. One such example of a complication is Placenta Previa, a condition in which the placenta blocks the cervix not allowing a natural birth.

There are certainly a list of challenges that older women may face while conceiving or during their pregnancy. But few of these conditions can be avoided if you can take very good care of yourself. Remember! Your baby is healthy if you are!

Here are a few basics you need to pay attention to -

  • Consult your Obstetrician before you start planning for a baby.  It is always good to speak to your obstetrician about your overall health and lifestyle before you plan. Your obstetrician may advice few lifestyle changes, if necessary, to improve your chances of a healthy pregnancy. In case you have trouble conceiving or otherwise, do not hesitate to discuss your concerns about fertility or pregnancy.

  • Seek regular prenatal care. Regular prenatal visits are a must and they help your obstetrician to monitor your health and your baby’s health. Mention any signs or symptoms that concern you. Talking to your obstetrician is likely to put your mind at ease.

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  • Eat a healthy diet. During pregnancy, your body will need more of folic acids, calcium, iron, vitamin D and other essential nutrients. Maintain a healthy diet to enrich your body with these nutrients. Starting a daily prenatal vitamin, ideally a few months before conception can help fill any gaps.

  • Gain weight wisely. Gaining the right amount of weight is necessary to support your baby’s health. It also makes it easier to shed the extra weight after delivery. Work with your obstetrician to determine what’s right for you.

  • Stay active. Regular physical activity can help you prepare for labor and childbirth by increasing your stamina and muscle strength. It can also help boost your energy level and improve your overall health. Consult your obstetrician before you start or continue an exercise regime.

  • Avoid risky substances. Smoking and alcohol consumption must be avoided right from the time you start planning to conceive.


Menstrual Health Management

The Birthplace

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No pickles, healthy diet, dark clothes are few of the many rituals which we follow religiously during menstruations. It may start with leaving you in a little bad mood, but soon after your periods, you ought to have a gentle upliftment of mood, full of life, good hair and skin day, making you feel very attractive.  

Imagine, taking care externally, without even having the slightest clue that menstruation, though a self-cleaning system, may need some extra pinch of love and care and thereby missing out on our cleanliness checklist by an inch and infecting ourselves!

Menstruating? Embrace the womanhood. Period.

Here are some tips to help you have a happy menstruation this month.

  • Wash yourself

Bathe yourself at least once a day. Make sure you wash your vagina or wipe it off after urination to avoid the excess blood which clings to the outer of the vagina. This also helps in minimising foul odor. Wash appropriately your genitals by going right; from the vagina to anus to stay away from any terrible transmission of microorganisms. It is advised to wash your clothes or bed-sheets with a disinfectant liquid.

  • Avoid using vagina hygiene products

The vagina is a self-cleaning biome which hates external interference and shows its irritation in form of discomfort or infections. Therefore, never use any external agent to clean the inside of the vagina. However, make sure you clean the vulva with mild soap and warm water to avoid vaginal or urinary tract infections.

  • This might sound against the regime but stick to one method of sanitation

The ways of menstrual sanitation have evolved from clothes to sanitary napkins and now menstrual cups, tampons have found their ways to the menstrual essentials of women. With various methods available, frequent switching of brands and methods are becoming commonplace. However, it is advised to stick to a particular brand or method to understand if it suits you well. Frequent shifts of brands or methods can lead to a bad-tempered vagina and cause discomfort including rashes.

Some women tend to use a combination of sanitation during heavy flows such as two sanitary napkins or one tampon and one sanitary napkin. Though this is a smart technique against heavy flows, yet it can be a source of infections. This is because women might find napkins/tampons not completely used up and delay the process of discarding the pads at regular intervals.

  • Beware of a pad rash

Try to stay dry during heavy flows by changing your pads frequently. Keep changing your pad as necessary or after every 6 hours. In case, you get rashes, visit your doctor for medication.

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  • Discard the sanitary napkin properly

This is one of the most important steps towards ensuring a community health. Used sanitary items are a source of infection and can cause health problems if they spread. It is advisable to wrap them properly before discarding to quarantine the bacteria. Ensure you wash your hands properly after discarding it. 

  • Wear different underwear for periods

It is recommended to keep different sets of panties for periods as they might be infected. In case of stains, use lemon or bleaching powder to remove them. Make sure you wear well-fitting cotton panties to let your vagina breathe.

  • Be prepared with essentials before your periods

The average menstrual cycle is of 28 days. So, while you’re on the go, carry an extra sanitary napkin or preferred type of sanitation and wrap them properly to avoid contamination along with some tissues. And yes! Stay hydrated.  

Having irregular periods or trouble with your menses? Reach out to our Expert Gynecologists today!