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The Birthplace Blog

Filtering by Category: Postnatal Care

Constipation and Related Problems

The Birthplace


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Constipation is a difficult problem, not because we cannot treat it but we hesitate to get treated in the first place. Our diet and food habits are increasingly becoming westernised which is resulting in low intake of fiber and increased consumption of refined carbohydrates, all of which causes constipation. Frequent constipation results in perianal problems such as Piles, Fissures, Fistulae, and Abscesses etc.

Piles, also known as Hemorrhoids, are swollen veins in your anus and lower rectum, similar to varicose veins. In the third trimester of pregnancy, the baby’s head descends into the pelvis and can result in pressure in that area resulting in piles. As a General Surgeon, I regularly see people suffering from all these perianal conditions but they usually ignore immediate treatment and come to a surgeon as a last resort.

Dr. Deepti is trained general, laparoscopic and bariatric surgeries. Graduating from a very prestigious college at KEM, Mumbai, she has also completed a fellowship of International Bariatric Club. She is actively involved in raising awareness regarding women related surgical problems.  To know more or to meet Dr. Deepti, please call 040-45208108. You can also write to her at  contactus@thebirthplace.com  or visit www.thebirthplace.com

Dr. Deepti is trained general, laparoscopic and bariatric surgeries. Graduating from a very prestigious college at KEM, Mumbai, she has also completed a fellowship of International Bariatric Club. She is actively involved in raising awareness regarding women related surgical problems.

To know more or to meet Dr. Deepti, please call 040-45208108. You can also write to her at contactus@thebirthplace.com or visit www.thebirthplace.com

In India, especially, women suffer a lot before consulting a doctor. They are also hesitant to share such problems with their family or even to their husbands and keep postponing treatment while suffering in silence. I agree that perianal diseases like piles, fissure, fistulae etc are not life threatening but they are so painful and inconvenient! Why go through all this pain when they are all amenable to simple treatment?

Another challenge with most of the Indian patients is that they try to avoid surgery at all costs. Even if it means years of suffering, medications, living a hermit lifestyle, it doesn’t matter to them as surgery is considered a curse.

It’s the 21st century! We have the most advanced and simple procedures available today to treat piles, fissure, fistulas etc. With LASER technology, the surgeries have become completely painless.

It is high time we stop postponing right treatments in favour of home remedies and non scientific techniques. We must educate ourselves and seek help when essential.

Looking for one-on-one counselling?

So here are some simple signs that tell you the need to see a Surgeon

  • Pain while passing stools

  • Bleeding with or after stool

  • Passage of very hard stool

  • Pus coming from anywhere near your anus

  • Sensation of some mass/tissue coming out of your anus

    Of course, Prevention Is Better than Cure. So we must

  • Drink 8-12 glasses of water per day (that’s 2-2.5lit)

  • Include a portion of fruit and vegetables in our diet

  • Cut down on refined foods, breads, non-veg, spice, fried food

  • Avoid sitting for long hours at a stretch

    So, to conclude, do not hesitate to get yourself treated for constipation in the initial stages itself. Go for a consultation right away!


Postpartum Depression: All You Need To Know

The Birthplace

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New to parenthood?

Raising a new-born baby is deemed to be one of the most beautiful moments in the lives of parents; nevertheless, it can also be an extremely action-packed, emotional, dramatic few weeks of the journey. Call them baby blues or an adaption towards parenthood, blame the hormones or the mood swings, but if you’re struggling with it, it’s time to give it a serious consideration.

It’s been more than two weeks, but you are still going through chapters of extreme sadness, low energy, anxiety, crying, change in sleep and eating patterns, fatigue etc., then there's a possibility that the baby blues are now shaping themselves into what medically is called ‘Postpartum Depression (PPD)’.

Dr. Jyotsna is an MD (Ob Gyn) from one of the top medical institutions in the country (JIPMER). In addition to her passion for obstetrics and preventive women's health, she is also an expert in gynecological endoscopy, with a special interest in the management of uterine fibroids and endometriosis.  To know more or to consult Dr. Jyotsna, please call 040-45208108. You can also write in to her at  contactus@thebirthplace.com  or visit www.thebirthplace.com

Dr. Jyotsna is an MD (Ob Gyn) from one of the top medical institutions in the country (JIPMER). In addition to her passion for obstetrics and preventive women's health, she is also an expert in gynecological endoscopy, with a special interest in the management of uterine fibroids and endometriosis.

To know more or to consult Dr. Jyotsna, please call 040-45208108. You can also write in to her at contactus@thebirthplace.com or visit www.thebirthplace.com

There is no sure-shot conjecture of the cause, but some premises indicate that depression, PMS, an earlier postpartum depression, stressful environment, social challenges, unwanted pregnancy, genetics and hormonal changes affect it. Some forms of postpartum depression also manifest themselves as hallucinations and homicidal thoughts.

The screening for postpartum depression is done by doctors typically in the first month of childbirth. It is suggested that new-moms should also visit doctors in the second and fourth month as symptoms of PPD, if any, tend to appear during these months. Some doctors also advise screening during the pregnancy phase.

Prevention is better than cure

For better health of the mother and her child, it is recommended to be aware of the factors that may inflict the journey emotionally. The presence of loved ones and a healthy environment is important for an expecting mother to be comfortable and happy. Emotional closeness, proper diet, and exercise are found to be helpful in inhibiting the symptoms of PPD.

Looking for one-on-one counselling?

Treatment

Administration of anti-depressants has been found to be effective and certain antidepressants do not have any effect on breast-feeding. However, other techniques like counselling by a mental health expert, support groups, proper diet and other recreational activities are also effective in subsiding the feeling of loneliness in women suffering from PPD.

Make sure you maintain regular visits to your obstetrician during pregnancy and do not brush aside your post-delivery check-ups!

Apprehensions And Concerns About Breastfeeding

The Birthplace

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Just had a new little addition to your family or expecting one? Here are few tips to breastfeed the baby successfully.

When is the best time to start feeding the baby?

The best time to start feeding the baby is immediately after the delivery, once the pediatrician asserts that the baby is fit to start sucking. In most cases, babies are able to start sucking immediately after delivery. Even in a cesearean section case, breast feeding can be initiated while the final stage of surgery is still going on, unless the mother is sedated. Babies are vigorous and active during the first half hour after delivery. They have the urge to suckle during this time. Thereafter, the baby goes into slumber and is drowsier. It is therefore very important to initiate breast feeding soon after delivery to facilitate proper latching and sucking.

How frequently should the baby be fed?

Dr. Madhavi, a senior Pediatrician, is an author of more than 600 articles in the field of medicine and nursing. An expert in the field of Pediatric Asthma and Neonatal Resuscitation, she is trained to meet the unique needs of children, through all of their developmental stages, as they grow and mature.  To know more or to consult Dr. Madhavi, please call 040-45208108. You can also write to her at  contactus@thebirthplace.com  or visit www.thebirthplace.com

Dr. Madhavi, a senior Pediatrician, is an author of more than 600 articles in the field of medicine and nursing. An expert in the field of Pediatric Asthma and Neonatal Resuscitation, she is trained to meet the unique needs of children, through all of their developmental stages, as they grow and mature.

To know more or to consult Dr. Madhavi, please call 040-45208108. You can also write to her at contactus@thebirthplace.com or visit www.thebirthplace.com

Ideally, a baby who is born after completion of the term of gestation and weighs more than 2.5 kgs, must be fed only on demand. Babies demand feeding by crying or by waking up from sleep and showing mannerisms like putting fingers to mouth, sucking of hands, moving towards the mother's breast, etc. However, in the first one week of life, the breastfeeding pattern is not well established and both mother and baby are learners and need practice. Sustained milk production is also not in place and this can happen only if the baby suckles for a longer time more frequently. Jaundice, which is common in newborns is more often seen in the first one week and frequent feeding reduces the levels of jaundice. It is for these reasons, that breastfeeding is advised atleast once in every 2 hours in the first one week after  delivery. After one week, baby can be fed on demand only. This rule applies only for healthy term babies who have more than 2.5 kg birth weight.

Both the breasts must be used equally through the day. Babies tend to prefer one side feeding, but that must be discouraged from the beginning. Otherwise, the ignored breast will gradually stop producing milk. There will also be disproportionate breast size for the woman, from cosmetic point-of-view. It is important to finish feeding from one side and then only go to the other side. When a baby starts feeding on one side, there will be trickling of milk from the other side. Mothers have a tendency to switch to that side thinking that the milk is getting wasted. That should not be done. One must allow the baby to complete feeding on one side and then only move to the other side. This is because, the initial milk, known as the fore milk is rich in carbohydrate. It gets digested easily and does not keep the baby satisfied for a long time. The milk that comes later, known as the hind milk is rich in fat. It digests slowly and keeps the baby satisfied for a longer time.

Ask Dr. Madhavi

What should be the duration of feeding?

“How much time should I feed my baby” is a frequently asked question. The meal-time at each breast is only 4 to 6 minutes. Beyond that time, only few drops of milk trickle. However, during the first one week of life, when breastfeeding is not well established, mothers need to feed for at least 15 to 20 minutes on each side. More the baby suckles; more milk is produced the next time. It is better to feed on both the sides during each feeding session until the baby is 3 to 4 weeks old. This will establish good feeding patterns. After that, the baby can be allowed to feed one breast only during each feeding session.

How can the mother know that the milk is sufficient for the baby?

When the baby takes sufficient milk, the baby will be able to sleep for at least 1 to 2 hours, will pass urine frequently and will gain weight adequately.