Hello! How Can You Get In Touch With Us?

We are located at: The Birthplace, Road No. 2, Banjara Hills, Hyderabad

Call us at: +91-40-4520-8108 or +91-40-6713-9999

Email us at: contactus@thebirthplace.com

You may also use the form here to get in touch with us and we will respond in 24 hours.

Your Name *
Your Name
         

123 Street Avenue, City Town, 99999

(123) 555-6789

email@address.com

 

You can set your address, phone number, email and site description in the settings tab.
Link to read me page with more information.

The Birthplace Blog

Filtering by Category: Pregnancy

Laparoscopic Surgery: All you need to know

The Birthplace

WomenWs%2BWellness%2BImage.jpg

Laparoscopic or minimally invasive surgery is a modern surgical technique in which operations are performed through small incisions (0.5 – 1.5 cm). This surgery is named after the laparoscope, a tool that has a high definition video camera and light at the end which is inserted through the small incision to view the affected organs. Through this laparoscope a video is relayed on the monitor which enables the surgeon to view. In case of a surgery, few more incisions may be made and required instruments are inserted to perform the surgery. These instruments are sleek and slender and hence do not require a larger incision. And smaller incisions mean faster recovery!

Laparoscopic surgery was initially used for gallbladder surgery and gynecological surgeries but now it has expanded to play a major role in surgeries related to abdomen and intestine areas. It also has a key role in infertility treatments.

Where is laparoscopy applicable in Gynecology?

As a diagnostic tool laparoscopy can be used to treat-

  • Infertility

  • Ovarian cyst or tumors

  • Ectopic pregnancy

  • Tubal abscess or adhesions

  • Endometriosis

As a therapeutic tool  it can be used to treat the following organs in the mentioned ways

Dr. Girija Lakshmi is an Obstetrician & Gynecologist with a focus on Fertility & Preconception. She has also trained in hysteroscopy and laparoscopy. She has helped hundreds of women successfully manage symptoms of poly-cystic ovary syndrome, uterine fibroids and even menopause related issues through medical and surgical interventions.  To know more or to consult Dr. Girija, please call 040-45208108. You can also write to her at  contactus@thebirthplace.com  or visit www.thebirthplace.com

Dr. Girija Lakshmi is an Obstetrician & Gynecologist with a focus on Fertility & Preconception. She has also trained in hysteroscopy and laparoscopy. She has helped hundreds of women successfully manage symptoms of poly-cystic ovary syndrome, uterine fibroids and even menopause related issues through medical and surgical interventions.

To know more or to consult Dr. Girija, please call 040-45208108. You can also write to her at contactus@thebirthplace.com or visit www.thebirthplace.com

  • Ovary

    • Ovarian drilling for PCOD to boost fertility

    • Ovarian cystectomy for removal of cysts in the ovary

    • Cauterisation for endometriosis treatment

  •  Uterus

    • Myomectomy for removal of fibroids without affecting the healthy tissue of the uterus

    • Hysterectomy  for removal of the uterus

  •  Tubes

    • For treating a tubal abscess and ectopic tubal pregnancy

    • Tubal sterilisation (Family planning)

What are the advantages?

Compared to a traditional surgery, laparoscopic surgery goes a long way its advantages and is usually the advised type of surgery.

  • It minimises the number of incisions needed

  • Decreases pain

  • Reduces blood loss when compared to open surgery

  • Early mobilisation and faster recovery

  • Shorter stay at the hospital. This also means reducing hospitalisation bills.

How soon can a patient resume regular activities after laparoscopy?

 For minor procedures under diagnostic laparoscopy and infertility, you can resume to work in 1-2 days. But in case of a major surgery like Hysterectomy,  2-7 days of rest is recommended. It is also advised to avoid intercourse, douching, strenuous exercise or lifting body weights for 4 weeks.

What is the role of laparoscopy in unexplained infertility cases?

 Many times when the cause of infertility cannot be ascertained a diagnostic laparoscopy can evaluate the uterine cavity, tubes and ovaries and correct them if needed. This increases the success rate by 20-30%.

Looking for one-on-one counselling?

Can emergency surgeries be performed under laparoscopy?

Gynec emergency surgeries like ruptured ectopic pregnancy, twisted/torsion of ovarian cyst or a ruptured ovarian cyst can be performed laparoscopically but this majorly depends on the surgical experience and expertise of the performing surgeon.

 What is the type of anaesthesia administered?

General anaesthesia is usually administered for most of the gynecological surgeries.

At the Birthplace, we are equipped with the best laparoscopic equipments along with the most experienced Laparoscopic surgeon, Dr. Girija Lakshmi who is trained to perform all kinds of gynec laparoscopic surgeries. She has also helped a lot of women with infertility issues to conceive through diagnostic laparoscopy and treatments.

Come visit the Birthplace today!

 

Eating for Two..?!

The Birthplace

Nutrition Image .jpg

During your pregnancy eating healthy is more important than ever. Without a doubt, a nutritious, well-balanced diet can be one of the first and best gifts you can give to your developing baby.

Nutrients in pregnancy:

Protein: It is critically essential for the body as it ensures proper growth of the fetal tissue, including the brain. It also helps with breast and uterine tissue growth during pregnancy and plays a major role in increasing blood supply, allowing more blood to be sent to the baby.

Servings per day: 3

Sources: Lentils, paneer, green peas, dals, beans, chicken, salmon, nuts, peanut butter, cottage cheese.

Calcium: It helps build your baby’s bones and regulates body’s use of fluids.

Servings per day: 3

Sources:  Milk, yogurt, cheese, cabbage, tofu, eggs, pudding.

Folate: Also known as folic acid, this drug plays an important part in reducing the risk of neural tube defects. This is a major birth defect that affects the baby’s brain and spinal cord, such as spina bifida and anencephaly.

Servings per day: 600 to 800 micrograms

Sources: Liver, nuts, dried beans and lentils, egg, nuts and peanut butter, dark green leafy vegetables.

Iron: It works with sodium, potassium, and water to increase blood flow which helps to ensure enough oxygen is supply to both the mother and the baby.

Serving per day: 27 milligrams

Sources: Dark green, leafy vegetables, citrus fruits, enriched breads or cereals, lean beef and poultry, eggs and dried fruits.

Looking for one-on-one counselling?

Evaluate your diet

Diet is important during pregnancy but it is a lot more important to make sure you’re eating a balanced and nutritious diet, so that, you and your growing baby can be as healthy as possible. Focus on the nutritional value of your diet and limit the intake of high fat, sugar, and sodium foods.

Eat:

  • three servings of protein per day

  • six or more servings of whole grains per day

  • five to six or more servings of fruits and vegetables per day

  • three or more servings of dairy products per day 

  • foods with essential fats

  • prenatal vitamins

Avoid:

Alcohol, excessive caffeine, raw meats and seafood, high-mercury fish, uncooked processed meats and unpasteurised dairy.

Nutrition is the key:

Women have increased nutritional needs during pregnancy. They need more protein, iron, calcium, and folic acid than they did before pregnancy. They  also need more calories.  Although the old adage of "eating for two" isn't  correct, a mom-to-be does require more micronutrients and macronutrients to support herself and her baby. It’s best to start adopting a healthy eating plan before pregnancy.

No matter the number of weeks left on your countdown calendar, it’s never too late to start! Supplying your body with a tasty blend of nutritious food can improve fertility, health during pregnancy, and pave the way for an easier labour.

Your body will gain weight during your pregnancy!

Your weight begins to increase as gestational weeks progress. Take it as proof that the body is nurturing the growing baby. On an average the baby has to grow to weigh 2.75-4 kilograms and to accomplish these productive changes, pregnant women need approximately 350 extra calories per day during their 2nd and 3rd trimester of pregnancy than they did before they were pregnant.

The ideal weight gain is usually 1-2 kgs in total during the first trimester and 1.5-2 kgs per month for the second and third trimester.

Other considerations

Apart from eating well, it’s important to drink at least eight glasses of water per day. You should also consume enough prenatal vitamins.

Here are few myths busted related to eating habits in pregnancy:

Myth: Pregnant women should be eating for two.

Fact: It is true that nutrient needs increase, but energy requirements only increase by about 150 calories / day in the first trimester and 350 calories per day for the second and third trimester of pregnancy.                                       

Myth: Low weight gain during pregnancy will make delivery easier.

Fact: Mothers who do not gain the required weight during pregnancy put their babies at a risk for severe complications. Complication like premature birth can cause lung and heart problems.

Myth: If the right amount of weight is gained during pregnancy, none of it will be fat gain.

Fact: A healthy pregnancy includes fat storage. A lot of energy is required during labor and breastfeeding which is used from these fat reserves.

Myth: A healthy pregnant woman will not experience discomforts.

Fact: Nausea, heartburn, and constipation are not biased! They will afflict women regardless of healthy living. However, women who regularly eat healthy food avoiding excess sugar and fat, drink plenty of water, exercise regularly may significantly reduce the uncomfortable symptoms of pregnancy.

With over 17 years of experience as a Clinical Nutritionist Dt. Manjusha K. R is a pioneer in the field. She has done her Masters in Nutrition & Dietetics and is a Life Member of Indian Dietetic Association & Nutrition Society of India .  She started her career as a Lecturer in Nutrition and was working with different multi speciality hospitals from 2001. Since 2014 she is associated with the Birthplace. With her experience as a clinical nutritionist and her association with doctors & physiotherapists she is perfectly equipped to deal with prenatal, postnatal and pediatric patients through one-on-one counselling.  To know more or to consult Dt. Manjusha, please call 040-45208108. You can also write to her at  contactus@thebirthplace.com  or visit www.thebirthplace.com

With over 17 years of experience as a Clinical Nutritionist Dt. Manjusha K. R is a pioneer in the field. She has done her Masters in Nutrition & Dietetics and is a Life Member of Indian Dietetic Association & Nutrition Society of India .

She started her career as a Lecturer in Nutrition and was working with different multi speciality hospitals from 2001. Since 2014 she is associated with the Birthplace. With her experience as a clinical nutritionist and her association with doctors & physiotherapists she is perfectly equipped to deal with prenatal, postnatal and pediatric patients through one-on-one counselling.

To know more or to consult Dt. Manjusha, please call 040-45208108. You can also write to her at contactus@thebirthplace.com or visit www.thebirthplace.com

Coffee is sometimes debated, as is fish. It is currently considered safe to drink up to one 12-ounce cup of coffee per day during pregnancy.

Fish contains essential fatty acids which are important for your baby’s brain development but some fish are high in mercury which can cause birth defects in your baby. Avoid eating Shark, Swordfish and King mackerel. Shrimp, Salmon, Catfish, and Pollock on the other end are generally considered safe.

Lastly, it goes without saying, avoid all alcohol and tobacco products during pregnancy for your baby’s healthy development.

Bleeding During Pregnancy

The Birthplace

2 in 1 - Nov. 8 - image.png

Bleeding or spotting during pregnancy is a very common sign noticed by most pregnant women. Research indicates that around 12% of women report spotting or bleeding during their first 12 weeks of pregnancy. This bleeding is usually very light compared to your regular periods and often varies in colour from pink to red to brown. Although this spotting is not something you should worry about, but any kind of bleeding during your pregnancy has to be reported to your obstetrician to ensure the cause is validated to rule out anything serious and to make sure you and your baby are healthy.

This article will help you understand the causes of bleeding or spotting during each trimester.

First Trimester

As indicated earlier most women report spotting or bleeding in the first 3 months of their pregnancy. Possible causes of first trimester bleeding include:

  • Implantation bleeding:  Bleeding that occurs when the fertilised egg implants itself into the uterine lining is called implantation bleeding. This is usually experienced within 6 to 12 days of conception, even before you know you are pregnant, and is often mistaken as a pending period. This bleeding is usually very light and lasts from a few hours to a few days.

  • Miscarriage: Miscarriage is one of the biggest concerns associated with the first trimester bleeding as it also occurs within 12 weeks of pregnancy. However, bleeding during the first trimester does not necessarily mean that you’ve lost the baby or going to miscarry. 90% of women who experience first trimester bleeding will not miscarry if there is a heartbeat noticed in the ultrasound.

    Strong cramps in the lower abdomen and tissue passing through the vagina are the other symptoms of miscarriage.

  • Ectopic Pregnancy: An ectopic pregnancy occurs when the fertilised embryo implants outside of the uterus, usually in the fallopian tube. It occurs in about 2% of pregnancies and is potentially dangerous. If untreated immediately, the embryo keeps growing and can cause the fallopian tube to burst and can be life-threatening to the mother.

  • Molar pregnancy: This is a less common condition in which abnormal tissue grows inside the uterus instead of a baby. In some cases, this tissue is cancerous and can affect the other parts of the body.

    Apart from bleeding, nausea and vomiting and rapid enlargement of the uterus are the other symptoms of this condition.

Dr. Girija Lakshmi is an Obstetrician & Gynecologist with a focus on Fertility & Preconception. She has also trained in hysteroscopy and laparoscopy. She has helped hundreds of women successfully manage symptoms of poly-cystic ovary syndrome, uterine fibroids and even menopause related issues through medical and surgical interventions.  To know more or to consult Dr. Girija, please call 040-45208108. You can also write to her at  contactus@thebirthplace.com  or visit www.thebirthplace.com

Dr. Girija Lakshmi is an Obstetrician & Gynecologist with a focus on Fertility & Preconception. She has also trained in hysteroscopy and laparoscopy. She has helped hundreds of women successfully manage symptoms of poly-cystic ovary syndrome, uterine fibroids and even menopause related issues through medical and surgical interventions.

To know more or to consult Dr. Girija, please call 040-45208108. You can also write to her at contactus@thebirthplace.com or visit www.thebirthplace.com

Second and Third Trimesters

Bleeding in the second or third trimester of your pregnancy calls for immediate attention as this may be more serious and can signal a problem with the mother or the baby. You must report to your Obstetrician with no further delay.

Here are few possible causes of bleeding in late pregnancy:

  • Placenta Previa: This is a condition when the placenta is attached to the lower part of the uterus and covers the cervix partially or completely. In this scenario, a vaginal delivery is not possible and a C-section is recommended as the placenta blocks the baby’s path of your body. This is very rare in the late third trimester, and stats show only 1 in 200 pregnancies have placenta previa. A bleeding placenta previa is an emergency which requires immediate medical attention.

  • Placental Abruption: This is a serious condition wherein the placenta detaches itself from the uterus wall before or during labor. The abruption usually causes stomach pain and the other symptoms may include abdominal pain, clots from the vagina, tender uterus and back pain.

  • Uterine Rupture: Uterine rupture occurs when a scar from a previous C-section tears open during pregnancy. This is a life-threatening condition and requires an emergency C-section. Pain and tenderness in the abdomen are the other symptoms of uterine rupture.

  • Vasa Previa: This is a very rare condition in which the developing baby's blood vessels in the umbilical cord cross the opening to the birth canal. Vasa previa can be very dangerous as it can cause the blood vessels to tear open which in turn causes the baby to bleed severely and lose oxygen. Abnormal fetal heart rate and excessive bleeding are signs to look out for.

  • Premature Labor:  This is the most common sort of bleeding seen late in pregnancy wherein a small amount of blood with mucus leaves the body.  This is an indication that your body is preparing for labor. This is also called as ‘Show’. If bleeding and symptoms of labor begin before the 37th week you should contact your obstetrician immediately as this might be a sign of preterm labor.

    Contractions, vaginal discharge, abdominal pressure, and ache in the lower back are the other symptoms of Premature labor.

Other  causes of bleeding in late pregnancy could be injury to the cervix or vagina, polyps or cancer.

Looking for one-on-one counselling?

What should you do if you have unusual bleeding during pregnancy?

Vaginal bleeding in any trimester should not be ignored and you should report to your Obstetrician immediately. Use a sanitary napkin to track the flow and record the type of blood. Do not use a tampon and refrain from having sex while you are bleeding. Make sure you bring any tissue that passes through your vagina to your obstetrician for testing.

You will be expected to undergo an ultrasound scan to understand the underlying cause of bleeding and treatment is given accordingly depending on the stage of your pregnancy.

Planning Pregnancy after 35..?

The Birthplace


09-03-2016 - Understanding Pregnancy image.png

Have you crossed 35 and are planning to conceive?

Yes! Then you are in good company. Many women are delaying pregnancy well into their 30s and beyond and are delivering healthy babies. The risks of pregnancy after 35 tend to get exaggerated but taking special care can help give you and your baby the best start.

Here are some challenges that you may face if you are planning to conceive post 35.

  • Getting pregnant might take a longer time. You are born with a limited number of eggs at birth. By puberty, you lose half of your eggs and by the time you reach your mid-to-late 30s, your eggs decrease in quantity and quality. Also at an older age, the eggs aren’t fertilized as easily as it would when you were younger. If you are in your late 30’s and haven’t been able to conceive for six months, consider consulting your obstetrician for advice.

  • Multiple pregnancy is very likely to occur. Hormonal changes with older age could cause the release of multiple eggs at the same time and hence increasing the chances of having twins. Pregnancy through assisted reproductive technologies may also result in conceiving twins.

  • The risk of pregnancy loss is higher. As you get older, perhaps due to pre-existing medical conditions or fetal chromosomal abnormalities, you are at a higher risk of having a miscarriage or a stillbirth. Research suggests that this may be due to a combination of a decrease in the quality of your eggs and an increase in the risk of chronic medical conditions such as high blood pressure and diabetes. During your last weeks of pregnancy, your obstetrician might suggest regular monitoring to ensure the well - being of the mother and the child.

  • The risk of chromosome abnormalities is higher. Babies born to mothers above the age of 35 are at a higher risk of certain chromosome problems, such as Down syndrome.

  • You’re more likely to develop gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes occurs only during pregnancy and is more common for women conceiving at an older age. Diabetes during pregnancy can cause the baby to grow larger than the average - increasing the risk of injuries during delivery. It is needed to control blood sugar levels through diet and physical activity to decrease the risk of preterm delivery, high blood sugar, and complications to your infant post birth.

  • You’re also likely to develop high blood pressure during pregnancy. High blood pressure that develops during pregnancy is most commonly seen in older women. You will need to visit your obstetrician more frequently to monitor your blood pressure and your baby’s development. If needed, you might have to deliver before your due date to avoid complications.

Dr. Samatha Kumar, is a senior gynecologist at the Birthplace with more than 11 years of experience, specializing in infertility, multiple births, and high-risk pregnancies.  To know more or to meet Dr. Samatha, please call 040-45208108. You can also write to her at  contactus@thebirthplace.com  or visit www.thebirthplace.com

Dr. Samatha Kumar, is a senior gynecologist at the Birthplace with more than 11 years of experience, specializing in infertility, multiple births, and high-risk pregnancies.

To know more or to meet Dr. Samatha, please call 040-45208108. You can also write to her at contactus@thebirthplace.com or visit www.thebirthplace.com

  • You’re more likely to have a premature birth. Premature birth often comes with complicated medical problems, especially for the babies born the earliest. They may also have very low birth weight.

  • You might need a C-section. Women conceiving at an older age are at a higher risk of pregnancy-related complications that might lead to a Cesarean. One such example of a complication is Placenta Previa, a condition in which the placenta blocks the cervix not allowing a natural birth.

There are certainly a list of challenges that older women may face while conceiving or during their pregnancy. But few of these conditions can be avoided if you can take very good care of yourself. Remember! Your baby is healthy if you are!

Here are a few basics you need to pay attention to -

  • Consult your Obstetrician before you start planning for a baby.  It is always good to speak to your obstetrician about your overall health and lifestyle before you plan. Your obstetrician may advice few lifestyle changes, if necessary, to improve your chances of a healthy pregnancy. In case you have trouble conceiving or otherwise, do not hesitate to discuss your concerns about fertility or pregnancy.

  • Seek regular prenatal care. Regular prenatal visits are a must and they help your obstetrician to monitor your health and your baby’s health. Mention any signs or symptoms that concern you. Talking to your obstetrician is likely to put your mind at ease.

Looking for one-on-one counselling?
  • Eat a healthy diet. During pregnancy, your body will need more of folic acids, calcium, iron, vitamin D and other essential nutrients. Maintain a healthy diet to enrich your body with these nutrients. Starting a daily prenatal vitamin, ideally a few months before conception can help fill any gaps.

  • Gain weight wisely. Gaining the right amount of weight is necessary to support your baby’s health. It also makes it easier to shed the extra weight after delivery. Work with your obstetrician to determine what’s right for you.

  • Stay active. Regular physical activity can help you prepare for labor and childbirth by increasing your stamina and muscle strength. It can also help boost your energy level and improve your overall health. Consult your obstetrician before you start or continue an exercise regime.

  • Avoid risky substances. Smoking and alcohol consumption must be avoided right from the time you start planning to conceive.


Diabetes during Pregnancy? Know more.

The Birthplace

shutterstock_142522390.jpg

When you are expecting, you often go through rounds of tests to ensure that your baby is healthy. You maintain a good diet, follow an exercise regime and do a lot of things you never did before. And while you find yourself changing externally, there are numerous changes which occur in your body unmasking themselves at various stages of pregnancy.

One of these changes is the high blood sugar level, which often shows itself up when you are halfway through your pregnancy. Medically, this condition is known as Gestational Diabetes and its dismaying  to know that Asian, African and Native American women are at higher risk of acquiring it. It is also a fact that gestational diabetes occurs in about 4% of all pregnancies.

THE CAUSE

Gestational diabetes is a condition characterised by high blood sugar (glucose) levels that is first recognised during pregnancy.

During pregnancy, increased levels of certain hormones made in the placenta help shift nutrients from the mother to the developing  fetus. To help prevent the mother from developing low blood sugar, the placenta produces other hormones which work by resisting the action of Insulin. Over the course of the pregnancy, these hormones lead to higher blood sugar levels. To try and bring these down, the body produces more insulin.

Dr. Girija Lakshmi is an Obstetrician & Gynecologist with a focus on Fertility & Preconception. She has also trained in hysteroscopy and laparoscopy. She has helped hundreds of women successfully manage symptoms of poly-cystic ovary syndrome, uterine fibroids and even menopause related issues through medical and surgical interventions.  To know more or to consult Dr. Girija, please call 040-45208108. You can also write to her at  contactus@thebirthplace.com  or visit www.thebirthplace.com

Dr. Girija Lakshmi is an Obstetrician & Gynecologist with a focus on Fertility & Preconception. She has also trained in hysteroscopy and laparoscopy. She has helped hundreds of women successfully manage symptoms of poly-cystic ovary syndrome, uterine fibroids and even menopause related issues through medical and surgical interventions.

To know more or to consult Dr. Girija, please call 040-45208108. You can also write to her at contactus@thebirthplace.com or visit www.thebirthplace.com

Usually, the mother's pancreas is able to produce more insulin to overcome the effect of the pregnancy hormones. If, however, the pancreas cannot produce enough insulin, blood sugar levels will rise, resulting in gestational diabetes.

WHO SHOULD BE CAREFUL?

  • Moms who were overweight before expecting

  • Moms who had gestational diabetes in the earlier pregnancies

  • Moms who have given birth to a stillborn baby before

  • Moms who have given birth to a baby of over 9 pounds before

  • Those who've had a family history of diabetes

To-be-moms diagnosed with gestational diabetes are vulnerable towards developing Type-2 diabetes later, though this may not hold true in all the cases. Usually, the screening tests for gestational diabetes are done between 24 to 28 weeks of the pregnancy age. Gestational diabetes, if treated in time, does not have any influence on the health of the baby. If left untreated, this can have major effects on the baby which includes stillbirth, or an unhealthy baby which has a likelihood of developing Type 2 diabetes in the long run.

Looking for one-on-one counselling?

HOW CAN YOU DETECT IT? 

Following are the few symptoms of gestational diabetes:

  • Impaired glucose tolerance or impaired fasting glucose (blood sugar levels are high, but not high enough to be diabetes)

  • Sugar in urine

  • Too much amniotic fluid (polyhydramnios)

The above conditions can be detected through an Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT), Urine dipstick for sugar and an Ultrasound scan respectively.

PREVENTIVE MEASURES

There is always some amount of precaution we can take even for situations not in our control!  

  • Exercise and maintain your diet before planning a pregnancy.

  • Healthy diets and recommended exercise help towards its treatment

  • Maintain regular visits to your Obstetrician / Gynecologist

  • Keeping a check on your blood sugar levels

Don’t worry! With proper treatment, you can deliver a healthy baby despite having diabetes.

Postpartum Depression: All You Need To Know

The Birthplace

Postpartum-Depression-Full.jpg

New to parenthood?

Raising a new-born baby is deemed to be one of the most beautiful moments in the lives of parents; nevertheless, it can also be an extremely action-packed, emotional, dramatic few weeks of the journey. Call them baby blues or an adaption towards parenthood, blame the hormones or the mood swings, but if you’re struggling with it, it’s time to give it a serious consideration.

It’s been more than two weeks, but you are still going through chapters of extreme sadness, low energy, anxiety, crying, change in sleep and eating patterns, fatigue etc., then there's a possibility that the baby blues are now shaping themselves into what medically is called ‘Postpartum Depression (PPD)’.

Dr. Jyotsna is an MD (Ob Gyn) from one of the top medical institutions in the country (JIPMER). In addition to her passion for obstetrics and preventive women's health, she is also an expert in gynecological endoscopy, with a special interest in the management of uterine fibroids and endometriosis.  To know more or to consult Dr. Jyotsna, please call 040-45208108. You can also write in to her at  contactus@thebirthplace.com  or visit www.thebirthplace.com

Dr. Jyotsna is an MD (Ob Gyn) from one of the top medical institutions in the country (JIPMER). In addition to her passion for obstetrics and preventive women's health, she is also an expert in gynecological endoscopy, with a special interest in the management of uterine fibroids and endometriosis.

To know more or to consult Dr. Jyotsna, please call 040-45208108. You can also write in to her at contactus@thebirthplace.com or visit www.thebirthplace.com

There is no sure-shot conjecture of the cause, but some premises indicate that depression, PMS, an earlier postpartum depression, stressful environment, social challenges, unwanted pregnancy, genetics and hormonal changes affect it. Some forms of postpartum depression also manifest themselves as hallucinations and homicidal thoughts.

The screening for postpartum depression is done by doctors typically in the first month of childbirth. It is suggested that new-moms should also visit doctors in the second and fourth month as symptoms of PPD, if any, tend to appear during these months. Some doctors also advise screening during the pregnancy phase.

Prevention is better than cure

For better health of the mother and her child, it is recommended to be aware of the factors that may inflict the journey emotionally. The presence of loved ones and a healthy environment is important for an expecting mother to be comfortable and happy. Emotional closeness, proper diet, and exercise are found to be helpful in inhibiting the symptoms of PPD.

Looking for one-on-one counselling?

Treatment

Administration of anti-depressants has been found to be effective and certain antidepressants do not have any effect on breast-feeding. However, other techniques like counselling by a mental health expert, support groups, proper diet and other recreational activities are also effective in subsiding the feeling of loneliness in women suffering from PPD.

Make sure you maintain regular visits to your obstetrician during pregnancy and do not brush aside your post-delivery check-ups!

Ease Your Body. Erase Your Worries.

The Birthplace


A developing bump, pregnancy glow, good hair days are welcoming changes which pregnancy brings, along with a sense of happiness. They also bring with it a multitude of not- so welcoming changes to your body. Evidence shows that physiotherapy, in principle, is helpful in tackling these unpleasant changes and provide relief from certain pregnancy related conditions like pelvic pain, urinary incontinence, lower back pain etc.

Before we get to these conditions, lets understand why exercising is important and how does it affect you and your baby.

miraclePT-6.jpg

WHY SHOULD YOU EXERCISE DURING PREGNANCY?

Exercising during pregnancy has a positive influence, both, on the mother and the baby. It can also help during the postpartum rehabilitation period. It can  ensure a comfortable nine months of pregnancy compared to not exercising at all. It is important to consult your obstetrician before starting any exercise regime.

Benefits for mom-to-be:

  • Reduction in risk of developing gestational diabetes and pregnancy-induced hypertension

  • Fewer obstetric intervention (forceps, vacuum extraction)

  • Reduction in the ‘active stage’ of labor

  • Quicker return to pre-pregnancy weight

  • Reduction in bone density loss during lactation state

  • Decreased incidence of ‘incontinence’ during pregnancy and postpartum

  • Reduction in common pregnancy complaints (leg cramps, back pain, hemorrhoids etc.)

Benefits for the baby: 

  • Infants have less body fat at birth

  • Infants are less cranky which in turn has reduction in the incidence of infant colic

  • Greater neurodevelopmental scores in oral language and motor areas (tested at age 5)

Dr. Snigdha Reddy is a certified Physiotherapist with over 7 years of clinical experience . She has worked as a Consultant in various hospitals in Hyderabad & has been associated with the Birthplace for the last 4 years. She is the co-owner/founder of Physio Pro.  To know more or to consult Dr. Snigdha, please call 040-45208108. You can also write to her at  contactus@thebirthplace.com

Dr. Snigdha Reddy is a certified Physiotherapist with over 7 years of clinical experience . She has worked as a Consultant in various hospitals in Hyderabad & has been associated with the Birthplace for the last 4 years. She is the co-owner/founder of Physio Pro.

To know more or to consult Dr. Snigdha, please call 040-45208108. You can also write to her at contactus@thebirthplace.com

PREGNANCY-RELATED CONDITIONS

Most women during pregnancy experience one or more of these conditions at different stages of gestation, at different levels of severity. Physiotherapy can help you deal with all these conditions for a smooth labor and easy recovery. Here are few pregnancy-related conditions that you may experience during your 9 months. 

Lower Backache:

As your belly gets bigger throughout your pregnancy, the hormonal changes that cause the otherwise stable joints to ease up; because of which, the lower back and pelvis loosen up, preparing the body for a vaginal delivery. In turn, your lower back curves more than usual to accommodate the load – resulting in strained muscles, soreness, stiffness, and pain in the lower back.

Urinary Incontinence:

Do you accidentally leak urine when you exercise, laugh, cough or sneeze? Do you experience a need to get to the toilet in a hurry?

Urinary incontinence is defined as a complaint of any involuntary loss of urine. This is due to the weakening of the pelvic floor muscles, which play a major role in bladder control, with the progression of pregnancy. As the pelvic floor muscles and the pelvis stretch and widen to accommodate the growing baby and its increasing weight, particularly in the final trimester, the muscles become weak and make it difficult to control the bladder.

Coccydynia:

Does it pain between your buttocks when you sit on a chair for long hours?

Coccydynia is commonly known as the Tailbone (Coccyx or bony area located deep between the buttocks above the anus) pain.  It is caused due to inflammation of the tailbone manifested by pain and tenderness. Your tailbone is right behind your uterus and as the baby develops and gets larger, it's bones push against yours, causing discomfort. The other cause is the pregnancy hormones. They make the ligaments (support and connect bones) in your body relax anticipating a vaginal delivery during which the bones could shift causing discomfort and pain. 

Picture1.png

Carpel Tunnel Syndrome:

Do you have tingling sensation and numbness in your hands?

The carpal tunnel is a bony canal formed by wrist bones on three sides and a ligament that runs across the wrist on the other. Fluid retention and swelling which is common during pregnancy can increase pressure in the narrow space compressing the median nerve that runs through it. This pressure on the nerve causes a tingling sensation, numbness, pain or a dull ache in the fingers, hand or wrist, worsening at night.

Diastasis Recti:

Noticed any obvious gap in your stomach muscle near the belly button area?

It is the separation of your outer most abdominal muscles  which creates a gap that allows your belly to pooch out. This may not be a painful condition but affects the physical appearance of your belly.  You may still look pregnant even after you delivered your baby.  Training your core abdomen muscles can help treat this condition. 

Picture2.png

Pelvic Girdle Pain:

Does it pain while moving your legs apart, especially when sitting, lying down or getting out of the car? Is turning over in bed painful?

Your pelvic girdle is the bony arched structure in your hip area that supports your legs - including the symphysis pubis joint, hip joint, coccyx, sacrum, and sacroiliac joint. Pain can occur during pregnancy when there is a mechanical problem within these joints. 

Looking for one-on-one counselling?

Pelvic pain is likely to be caused by a combination of factors, including:

  • the joints in your pelvis moving unevenly

  • changes to the way your muscles work to support your pelvic girdle joints

  • one pelvic joint not working properly and causing knock-on pain in the other joints of your pelvis

All the above conditions can be alleviated. Meet a certified physiotherapist today  at the Birthplace to cope with these pregnancy conditions.


Ectopic Pregnancy: All you need to know

The Birthplace

shutterstock_186137477.jpg

Have you got your periods too late? Are you feeling nauseated? Are you undergoing those pregnancy cramps or shoulder pain with a lot of queasiness? Do you experience some discomfort in the abdomen?

We know, it would be hard to identify what’s normal and what needs a medical examination, given the minimal expression of unique characteristics.  But experiences such as these may call for immediate medical attention, as this might be a typical case of ectopic pregnancy.

Dr. Girija Lakshmi is an Obstetrician & Gynecologist with a focus on Fertility & Preconception. She has also trained in hysteroscopy and laparoscopy. She has helped hundreds of women successfully manage symptoms of poly-cystic ovary syndrome, uterine fibroids and even menopause related issues through medical and surgical interventions.  To know more or to consult Dr. Girija, please call 040-45208108. You can also write to her at  contactus@thebirthplace.com  or visit www.thebirthplace.com

Dr. Girija Lakshmi is an Obstetrician & Gynecologist with a focus on Fertility & Preconception. She has also trained in hysteroscopy and laparoscopy. She has helped hundreds of women successfully manage symptoms of poly-cystic ovary syndrome, uterine fibroids and even menopause related issues through medical and surgical interventions.

To know more or to consult Dr. Girija, please call 040-45208108. You can also write to her at contactus@thebirthplace.com or visit www.thebirthplace.com

Ectopic pregnancy is a condition when the embryo implants itself outside the uterus, or as called in medical terms “Extra-uterine Implantation”. Such pregnancies are often considered complicated and exhibit certain symptoms. Listed below are few of the experiences which to-be-moms undergo:

  • Common symptoms include vaginal bleeding and torrents of sharp abdominal or pelvic pain. Other symptoms in some cases can be diarrhea, nausea or vomiting accompanied by pain.

  • Ectopic pregnancy is qualified when there is a very less increase in the amount of hCG during the test or also when the hCG level does not double in 48 hrs.

  • Fallopian tube rupture may cause severe discomfort in the pelvic region in addition to dizziness or fainting.

Medical demonstration of ectopic pregnancy generally occurs between 4-8 weeks counted from the last normal menses.

Ectopic pregnancies, medically, have never been regarded as safe for expecting mothers and can lead to death if left untreated. Ectopic embryos, which do not have a normal development, may reduce the chances of further normal pregnancies, esp., in the advancing age, therefore, necessitating immediate embryo removal for mother’s health and fertility. Embryo removal is administered through medication or surgery depending on the location of the implanted embryo.

Looking for one-on-one counselling?

Since the symptoms are masked and largely imitate symptoms of first-trimester pregnancy, I advise you to maintain regular visits with your doctor, and follow the suggested regime and tests.

An ectopic pregnancy can be very overwhelming and unaccounted for. Engage yourself in various activities and care for yourself  through healthy diet and proper rest.

Talk to your doctor about how to ensure a healthy pregnancy in future.

Passive Smoking is Equally Injurious when you are Expecting!!!

The Birthplace


Are you planning to have a baby?  Are you pregnant? If the answer to either of these questions is "Yes".  Then there is another important question for you, do you or your partner smoke?

Smoking is an addiction not many find easy to let go, but if you ’re planning to or already having a baby, here are a few things you must be aware of. 

shutterstock_600377777.jpg

What does smoking do to your body?

Cigarette contains more than 4,000 chemicals, including cyanide, lead and other carcinogens. The smoke enters your bloodstream which is the only source of nutrition for the baby.

Usually, the first nicotine dose also makes a large difference by significantly tightening the blood vessels and it also hinders oxygen flow to the baby. If the baby doesn’t get sufficient oxygen it could lead to altered brainstem development, altered lung structure, and cerebral palsy, stunned growth, premature birth, or low weight during birth or stillbirth.    

What if you are not the one smoking?

Even if you are not smoking, being exposed to smoke during pregnancy has a detrimental effect on the prenatal health of the baby. It could lead to the following –

  • Delivery before full term is complete

  • Low weight at birth

  • Undermined psychological and physiological development

  • Asthma or allergic rhinitis

  • Unexpected Miscarriage

  • Sudden Infant Death Syndrome

Passive smoke, also known as Second Hand Smoke, that  gets transferred from husbands, friends or other family members can also affect the growth of the baby. The baby’s source of breathing is what you breathe in and if you inhale carcinogens and other harmful chemicals, it finds a way to get into your baby’s lungs too!

What are the other means of transferring smoke?

Toxins have a very sly way of creeping into your breathing or living space. This is usually referred to as Third Hand Smoke, which is residue left behind on furniture, rugs, paint on the walls etc. The surroundings could smell of smoke even if no one is currently smoking, there is a good chance that there is tobacco residue still there. Upon inhaling, these toxins are absorbed into your blood and shared with your baby.

Can effects of smoking be passed down genetically?

Yes! They can! If your grandmother smoked while your mother was pregnant with you, there is a high chance of you being affected by Asthma and other genetic disorders. Genetic history of smoking also alters your genetic make-up and increases your chances of acquiring and transferring diseases to your unborn child.

How can you ensure a smoke-free prenatal zone?

  • Encourage your partner to quit

  • Wear a mask to cover your nose

  • Practice breathing exercises and Prenatal Yoga

  • Avoid places where smoking is prevalent

  • Visit open area places, preferably the ones with a lot greenery!

Looking for one-on-one counselling?

How can we help you in getting the best prenatal growth for the baby?

We at the Birthplace have an excellent team of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists who can guide you and your partner on improving the prenatal health of your baby. We also have a specialist team of Nutritionists, Yoga and Lamaze  Instructors who can work with you to ensure your baby eats and breathes well!

Interested in what we have to offer? Reach out to us!


Multiple Pregnancy: Expecting Twins...or Triplets?!

The Birthplace


shutterstock_636954499.jpg

Having twins, triplets or even quadruplets can be exciting, but it may also bring worries and concerns for you, your partner and family members. If you are expecting more than one baby, it is important that you are well prepared for the changes that will take place both during your pregnancy and after the babies’ birth.

Here is everything you need to know to be prepared!

What is a multiple pregnancy?

A ‘multiple pregnancy’ is the term used when you are expecting two or more babies at the same time. It occurs in about one in 80 pregnancies. Fertility treatment increases the chances of multiple pregnancy.

What are the different kinds of multiple pregnancy?

At your early ultrasound scan which confirms whether you are carrying twins or triplets, it is important to find out the ‘chorionicity’ of your pregnancy. This is to help identify whether your babies share a placenta and it is important because babies who share a placenta have a higher risk of complications.

Twins can be:

  • Dichorionic-Diamniotic (DCDA) – if two eggs are fertilized or if one egg splits soon after fertilization, each baby has its own placenta with its own outer membrane called a ‘chorion’ and its own amniotic sac

  • Monochorionic Diamniotic (MCDA) – if the fertilized egg splits a little later, the babies share a placenta and chorion but they each have their own amniotic sac; these babies are always identical

  • Monochorionic Monoamniotic (MCMA) – much less commonly, the fertilized egg splits later still and the babies share the placenta and chorion and are inside the same amniotic sac; these babies are always identical; this is rare and carries additional risks.

Similarly, triplets can be Tri-chorionic (each baby has a separate placenta and chorion), Di-chorionic (two of the three babies share a placenta and chorion and the third baby is separate), or Mono-chorionic (all three babies share a placenta and chorion).

What does a multiple pregnancy mean for my babies and me?

For you:  Minor problems that many pregnant women experience, such as morning sickness, heartburn, swollen ankles, varicose veins, backache, and tiredness, are more common in multiple pregnancies. They get better naturally after the babies are born. Any problems that arise in any pregnancy are more common with twins and include:

Dr. Samatha Kumar, is a senior gynecologist at the Birthplace with more than 11 years of experience, specializing in infertility, multiple births, and high-risk pregnancies.  To know more or to meet Dr. Samatha, please call 040-45208108. You can also write to her at  contactus@thebirthplace.com  or visit www.thebirthplace.com

Dr. Samatha Kumar, is a senior gynecologist at the Birthplace with more than 11 years of experience, specializing in infertility, multiple births, and high-risk pregnancies.

To know more or to meet Dr. Samatha, please call 040-45208108. You can also write to her at contactus@thebirthplace.com or visit www.thebirthplace.com

  • anemia – this is usually caused by a shortage of iron because developing babies use up a lot of iron

  • pre-eclampsia – a condition that causes high blood pressure and protein in your urine

  • a higher chance of bleeding more heavily than normal after the birth

  • a higher chance of needing a caesarean section or assisted vaginal delivery to deliver your babies

For your babies: You are more likely to have premature babies if you are expecting twins or triplets. Babies born earlier than 37 weeks of pregnancy have an increased risk of problems, particularly with breathing, feeding, and infection. The earlier your babies are born, the more likely this is to be the case. They may need to be looked after in a neonatal unit.

Also, having twins increases the chance of the placenta not working as well as it should. This can affect the babies’ growth and wellbeing. Twins sharing a placenta (monochorionic pregnancies) also share the blood supply. In around 15 in 100 monochorionic twin pregnancies, the blood flow may be unbalanced. This is called twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS). One baby, the ‘donor’, receives too little blood and has a low blood pressure while the other baby, the ‘recipient’, receives too much blood and has a high blood pressure. You will be monitored with frequent scans for signs of TTTS. It can be mild and may not require any treatment, or it can be serious, in which case you will be offered treatment in a hospital with specialist expertise.

How will my pregnancy be managed?

You will be under the care of a specialist healthcare team and will be advised to have your babies in a consultant-led maternity unit that has a neonatal unit. Your team will usually include an Obstetrician who specializes in multiple pregnancies, Fetal medicine expert, Nutritionist, Lactation consultant and an excellent Neonatal Team.

  • Having a multiple pregnancy means that you will need more visits to the antenatal clinic at your hospital.

  • You will be offered extra ultrasound scans to monitor your babies’ growth more closely. It could be as frequent as every 2 weeks from 16 weeks of pregnancy.

  • You may be advised to take iron tablets and folic acid each day throughout your pregnancy. Also, if there are risk factors for pre-eclampsia, you may be advised to take low-dose aspirin from 12 weeks of pregnancy onwards to reduce the risk.

  • Ultrasound / clinical assessments of the cervix may be done at regular intervals for measuring the length since a short cervical length is found to be associated with a higher chance of premature delivery. In case of a short cervix length, a cervical cerclage is done to suture the cervical opening.

Looking for one-on-one counselling?

How will I deliver my babies?

Delivery depends on many factors including fetal positions, gestational age, the health of the mother and babies. If both the babies are in a head down positions and there are no other complications a vaginal delivery is possible.

Caesarean delivery is for babies that are in abnormal positions, who are discordant in growth, or in higher order multiples, like triplets and more. In latter case, the babies are usually delivered by cesarean section unless you are in very premature labor or you give birth to the first baby very quickly.

Vaginal delivery may take place in the operating room because of a greater risk of complications which may require a Caesarean Section. 

Your own preference is also important and you should be given enough time to consider all of the relevant information before deciding what suits you best.

Will I be able to sufficiently breastfeed my babies?

Breast milk is best for new-born babies and your body should produce enough milk for your babies. If you encounter difficulties, our lactation expert will offer you the advice and support you need.

How will I cope with two babies at once?

Twins often come early and you will have a bigger bump than if you were having just one baby. You might consider stopping work early, possibly at around 28 weeks. When the babies are born, it will be a very busy time for any household but it is made much easier if you are supported and accept help when it is offered.

What is the Multi-Fetal Pregnancy Reduction?

In recent years, a procedure called multi-fetal pregnancy reduction has been used for very high numbers of fetuses, especially four or more. This procedure involves injecting one or more fetuses with medications, causing fetal death. The objective of multi-fetal reduction is that by reducing the number of fetuses in the pregnancy, the remaining fetuses may have a better chance for health and survival.